The Latest on a settlement between a major U.S. trucking company and four Sikh drivers who filed discrimination complaints for being denied jobs after refusing drug tests that would have violated their religious beliefs (all times local):

12:05 p.m.

The federal anti-discrimination agency says a trucking company agreed to offer jobs to four Sikh truckers denied employment after refusing drug tests that violated their religious beliefs.

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said the offers are part of a $260,000 agreement announced Tuesday with J.B. Hunt Transport Services Inc. to settle discrimination charges.

The Sikh Coalition, a civil rights organization, says the California men are not seeking jobs with J.B. Hunt.

The trucking company refused to hire them after they declined to submit to having hair clipped for drug tests or to remove a turban before providing a urine sample.

Observant Sikhs never cut their hair and wear turbans in public at all times.

An EEOC spokeswoman says the company did not admit liability. J.B. Hunt declined to comment.

4:50 a.m.

A national trucking company has agreed to pay $260,000 to settle discrimination complaints by four Sikh truckers who were denied jobs for refusing drug tests that violated their religious beliefs.

J.B. Hunt Transport Services Inc. reached the settlement being announced Tuesday with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

The Sikh Coalition, a civil rights organization that represented the men, says the trucking company required three men to clip their hair for drug samples and required a fourth to remove his turban before providing a urine sample.

Observant Sikhs never cut their hair and wear turbans in public at all times.

The four men were denied jobs when they refused to submit to the tests and weren't provided testing alternatives.

A lawyer for J.B. Hunt says the company won't comment.