New York

At retrial in 1979 case, the (ex) jury is in _ the audience

  • FILE- In this Oct. 21, 2016 file photo, a group of former jurors in the previous trial of Pedro Hernandez, including Cynthia Cueto, foreground left, and Jennifer O'Connor, right, arrive to observe his retrial. Former jurors and alternates were in the courtroom audience when a retrial opened last week in the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz. Some ex-jurors have shown up for even routine court hearings, and a handful plan to attend as much of the retrial as they can. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

    FILE- In this Oct. 21, 2016 file photo, a group of former jurors in the previous trial of Pedro Hernandez, including Cynthia Cueto, foreground left, and Jennifer O'Connor, right, arrive to observe his retrial. Former jurors and alternates were in the courtroom audience when a retrial opened last week in the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz. Some ex-jurors have shown up for even routine court hearings, and a handful plan to attend as much of the retrial as they can. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, file photo, Adam Sirois, the lone holdout juror in the previous trial of Pedro Hernandez, arrives for the first day of a retrial in New York surrounding the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz. Former jurors and alternates were in the courtroom audience when a retrial opened in the 1979 disappearance of Patz. Some ex-jurors have shown up for even routine court hearings, and a handful plan to attend as much of the retrial as they can. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

    FILE - In this Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, file photo, Adam Sirois, the lone holdout juror in the previous trial of Pedro Hernandez, arrives for the first day of a retrial in New York surrounding the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz. Former jurors and alternates were in the courtroom audience when a retrial opened in the 1979 disappearance of Patz. Some ex-jurors have shown up for even routine court hearings, and a handful plan to attend as much of the retrial as they can. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)  (The Associated Press)

Some jurors who deadlocked last year in one of America's most notorious missing-child cases now feel a new duty — to see the case through as it's retried.

Eight former jurors and alternates were in a New York courtroom audience when a retrial opened last week in the 1979 disappearance of Etan Patz (AY'-tahn PAYTS'). A handful plan to attend as much of the retrial as they can.

The former jurors come from both sides of last year's 11-1 deadlock. Some from the pro-conviction majority say they were frustrated by the impasse and want to show support for Etan's family.

The holdout for acquittal says he feels just as strongly about his view.

Suspect Pedro Hernandez confessed, but his defense says he's mentally ill and only imagined committing the crime.