EDUCATION

Brown celebrates indigenous peoples after renaming holiday

  • Ecuadorian dancers return from a performance on the University of Oregon campus during a daylong celebration of Indigenous Peoples' Day in Eugene, Ore. Monday, Oct. 10, 2016. Observed by a growing number of cities in place of Columbus Day, it follows a Eugene City Council resolution last March establishing the second Monday in October as Indigenous Peoples' Day. The campus event, sponsored by the Native American Student Union, is expected to be an annual celebration of indigenous spirit and culture. (Brian Davies/The Register-Guard via AP)

    Ecuadorian dancers return from a performance on the University of Oregon campus during a daylong celebration of Indigenous Peoples' Day in Eugene, Ore. Monday, Oct. 10, 2016. Observed by a growing number of cities in place of Columbus Day, it follows a Eugene City Council resolution last March establishing the second Monday in October as Indigenous Peoples' Day. The campus event, sponsored by the Native American Student Union, is expected to be an annual celebration of indigenous spirit and culture. (Brian Davies/The Register-Guard via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Winnebago Tribe activist Frank LaMere, bottom center, speaks to participants during a rally outside the State Capitol to celebrate the first Indigenous Peoples Day, in Lincoln, Neb., Monday, Oct. 10, 2016. The Lincoln City Council voted last month to mark the second Monday of October, normally observed as Columbus Day, as Indigenous Peoples Day. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

    Winnebago Tribe activist Frank LaMere, bottom center, speaks to participants during a rally outside the State Capitol to celebrate the first Indigenous Peoples Day, in Lincoln, Neb., Monday, Oct. 10, 2016. The Lincoln City Council voted last month to mark the second Monday of October, normally observed as Columbus Day, as Indigenous Peoples Day. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)  (The Associated Press)

  • Frank Bear Killer of the Oglala Lakota Tribe addresses participants during a rally outside the State Capitol to mark the first Indigenous Peoples Day, in Lincoln, Neb., Monday, Oct. 10, 2016. The Lincoln City Council voted last month to mark the second Monday of October, normally observed as Columbus Day, as Indigenous Peoples Day. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

    Frank Bear Killer of the Oglala Lakota Tribe addresses participants during a rally outside the State Capitol to mark the first Indigenous Peoples Day, in Lincoln, Neb., Monday, Oct. 10, 2016. The Lincoln City Council voted last month to mark the second Monday of October, normally observed as Columbus Day, as Indigenous Peoples Day. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)  (The Associated Press)

Students and faculty at Brown University have celebrated Indigenous Peoples' Day after faculty renamed what used to be called Columbus Day.

Dozens gathered at the Providence campus Monday to mark the occasion.

The Ivy League University in 2009 changed the name of the holiday that falls on the second Monday of October to Fall Weekend. Some said the change didn't go far enough though, so they changed it again in February.

Renaming the holiday, according to the rationale for the motion, "would recognize the contributions of Indigenous People/Native Americans to our community and our culture and foster a more inclusive community."

Efforts are underway nationwide to drop the Columbus Day name — named in honor of explorer Christopher Columbus — because it represents the oppression of Native Americans.