EDUCATION

Iowa State president: 'Learned my lesson' on use of plane

This undated photo provided by the Bloomington Normal Airport Authority shows a damaged wing of a Cirrus SR22 single engine plane at the Central Illinois Regional Airport in Bloomington, Ill. Iowa State University President Steven Leath caused "substantial damage" to the university airplane he was piloting when it made a hard landing at the Illinois airport last year. ISU pilots have flown Leath and his wife to and from the North Carolina town where they own a home and business on several occasions, costing thousands of dollars in university donations.  (Bloomington Normal Airport Authority via AP)

This undated photo provided by the Bloomington Normal Airport Authority shows a damaged wing of a Cirrus SR22 single engine plane at the Central Illinois Regional Airport in Bloomington, Ill. Iowa State University President Steven Leath caused "substantial damage" to the university airplane he was piloting when it made a hard landing at the Illinois airport last year. ISU pilots have flown Leath and his wife to and from the North Carolina town where they own a home and business on several occasions, costing thousands of dollars in university donations. (Bloomington Normal Airport Authority via AP)  (The Associated Press)

Iowa State University President Steven Leath says he'll be more cautious after facing criticism over his use of university airplanes and a private $1.1 million land deal with his boss.

Leath told the student government Wednesday night that he misjudged how both issues would be perceived, saying: "I've learned my lesson."

The student government later voted to call on the Iowa Board of Regents to investigate Leath's use of two university airplanes.

Leath, a pilot, has been under scrutiny since The Associated Press revealed he'd damaged a university plane in a hard landing on his way home from North Carolina, where he has a mountain home. He's also faced criticism for purchasing 145 acres of recreational land and timber from a company owned by Board of Regents President Bruce Rastetter.