OK, so let's get this straight:

As of today, Nate Silver's "polls-plus" analysis gives Donald Trump a 25.1 percent chance of winning the election.

Marco was not uniting the GOP in early March, and Trump is not doomed now.

Most of the British betting houses are giving him about the same chance, with 3 to 1 odds being offered, according to Oddschecker.

On PredictIt, Trump's chances are selling for 28 cents -- meaning they give him a 28 percent chance.

So there's a pretty strong consensus that as of today, Trump has a one in four chance of being elected. That's a better chance than the bookmakers are giving that the Washington Nationals will win the World Series (those odds are about 5 to 1).

See the Fox News 2016 battleground prediction map and make your own election projections. See Predictions Map →

Now, no sportswriter is going to say that the Nationals have no chance of winning the World Series. It will be difficult, of course, but sports fans understand that they have a realistic chance. Similarly, everyone should be confident that Trump has a realistic chance of winning this election. Did he make unforced errors along the way that made his climb much steeper? Absolutely. Should he be doing better, given how lame a candidate he's up against? Yes. It will be difficult -- the odds are against him -- but he can still win.

So why is National Review running this piece, "Trump Is Losing Pennsylvania and Closing His Path to the White House," which claims that Trump has "killed his campaign" and has "effectively blown his chances"? One expects the likes of CNN and NBC to report in such a manner. But a legendary conservative journal?

Remember that this is the same National Review that published a piece on March 1 stating that Marco Rubio was unifying the GOP behind his campaign. How did that work out?

The first duty of any political commentator is to give his or her readers accurate and trustworthy information about what is actually happening on Planet Earth -- not made-up narratives that he or she wishes were true. Marco was not uniting the GOP in early March, and Trump is not doomed now. Smart readers know these things, which is why they are tuning out commentators who won't face reality.

Laura Ingraham joined FOX News Channel in 2007 and currently serves as a contributor, providing political analysis and commentary to FNC's daytime and primetime programming. She is the Editor-in-Chief of LifeZette.com.  In addition to her role as a contributor, Ingraham is a frequent substitute host on FNC's "The O'Reilly Factor." As the host of the radio program "The Laura Ingraham Show," she is also the most listened-to woman in political talk radio in the United States, heard by hundreds of radio stations nationwide. Ingraham previously served as a litigator and Supreme Court law clerk.