RELIGION

Mormon missionaries to stay in Russia despite new law

  • FILE- In this Jan. 31, 2008, file photo, a class of Mormon missionaries practice the Russian language with each other at the Mormon Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah. Mormon missionaries will remain in Russia despite the country's new anti-terrorism law, which will put greater restrictions on religious work starting later this month. In a statement issued Friday, July 8, 2016, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said that missionaries will respect a measure that Russian President Vladimir Putin signed into law this week. (AP Photo/George Frey, File)

    FILE- In this Jan. 31, 2008, file photo, a class of Mormon missionaries practice the Russian language with each other at the Mormon Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah. Mormon missionaries will remain in Russia despite the country's new anti-terrorism law, which will put greater restrictions on religious work starting later this month. In a statement issued Friday, July 8, 2016, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said that missionaries will respect a measure that Russian President Vladimir Putin signed into law this week. (AP Photo/George Frey, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE- In this Jan. 31, 2008, file photo, Sister Erica Glenn, left, and other missionaries take Russian language class at the Mormon Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah. Mormon missionaries will remain in Russia despite the country's new anti-terrorism law, which will put greater restrictions on religious work starting later this month. In a statement issued Friday, July 8, 2016, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said that missionaries will respect a measure that Russian President Vladimir Putin signed into law this week. (AP Photo/George Frey, File)

    FILE- In this Jan. 31, 2008, file photo, Sister Erica Glenn, left, and other missionaries take Russian language class at the Mormon Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah. Mormon missionaries will remain in Russia despite the country's new anti-terrorism law, which will put greater restrictions on religious work starting later this month. In a statement issued Friday, July 8, 2016, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said that missionaries will respect a measure that Russian President Vladimir Putin signed into law this week. (AP Photo/George Frey, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE- In this Jan. 31, 2008, file photo, two Mormon missionaries walk past a large map of the world in a hallway at the Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah. Mormon missionaries will remain in Russia despite the country's new anti-terrorism law, which will put greater restrictions on religious work starting later this month. In a statement issued Friday, July 8, 2016, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said that missionaries will respect a measure that Russian President Vladimir Putin signed into law this week. (AP Photo/George Frey, File)

    FILE- In this Jan. 31, 2008, file photo, two Mormon missionaries walk past a large map of the world in a hallway at the Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah. Mormon missionaries will remain in Russia despite the country's new anti-terrorism law, which will put greater restrictions on religious work starting later this month. In a statement issued Friday, July 8, 2016, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said that missionaries will respect a measure that Russian President Vladimir Putin signed into law this week. (AP Photo/George Frey, File)  (The Associated Press)

Mormon missionaries will remain in Russia despite the country's new anti-terrorism law that puts restrictions on religious work.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said in a statement Friday that missionaries will honor the law, which takes effect July 20.

Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a bill into law Thursday that includes a requirement that missionary work be done by people affiliated with registered organizations.

The law also states religious work can only be done in houses of worship and other related religious sites.

Missionaries and organizations caught praying and disseminating materials in private residences could be subject to fines of up to $15,500.

The law also calls for heightened telephone and social media surveillance.

The Mormon church says it will work within the confines of the law.