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File 17 is glimpse into still-secret 28 pages about 9/11

  • FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2001, file photo, firefighters work beneath the destroyed mullions, the vertical struts which once faced the soaring outer walls of the World Trade Center towers, after a terrorist attack on the twin towers in New York. White House and intelligence officials are deciding whether to declassify 28 pages of a congressional investigation into the Sept. 11 attacks. The still-secret chapter could answer or raise new questions about possible Saudi links to the attackers. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2001, file photo, firefighters work beneath the destroyed mullions, the vertical struts which once faced the soaring outer walls of the World Trade Center towers, after a terrorist attack on the twin towers in New York. White House and intelligence officials are deciding whether to declassify 28 pages of a congressional investigation into the Sept. 11 attacks. The still-secret chapter could answer or raise new questions about possible Saudi links to the attackers. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Dec. 11, 2008 file photo, Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism Commission Chair, former Florida Sen. Bob Graham, left, listens as Vice Chair, former Missouri Sen. Jim Talent testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. White House and intelligence officials are deciding whether to declassify 28 pages of a congressional investigation into the Sept. 11 attacks. The still-secret chapter could answer or raise new questions about possible Saudi links to the attackers. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)

    FILE - In this Dec. 11, 2008 file photo, Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism Commission Chair, former Florida Sen. Bob Graham, left, listens as Vice Chair, former Missouri Sen. Jim Talent testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. White House and intelligence officials are deciding whether to declassify 28 pages of a congressional investigation into the Sept. 11 attacks. The still-secret chapter could answer or raise new questions about possible Saudi links to the attackers. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)  (The Associated Press)

There's been much clamor about releasing 28 still-secret pages of a congressional inquiry into the Sept. 11 attacks.

But drawing less notice is the fact that the government quietly declassified a report listing more than three dozen individuals who piqued the interest of investigators probing possible Saudi connections to the hijackers.

That report was written by two investigators who worked on the congressional inquiry.

Former Sen. Bob Graham was co-chairman of that review, and he believes the hijackers had an extensive Saudi support system while they were in the United States. Graham says much of what's in the declassified file is based on what's in the 28 pages. He's hoping the 28 pages will come out this summer or fall.

Saudi officials say allegations of Saudi complicity are baseless.