TERROR

New York's Sept. 11 Tribute Center plans to move, expand

  • Jennifer Adams-Webb, right, CEO and co-founder for the September 11 Tribute Center, stands next to a rendering of the center's new museum, left, during a press conference, Tuesday, June 21, 2016, in New York. The Sept 11 Tribute Center, an exhibition center depicting events of 9/11, will move to a new expanded location near the World Trade Center. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

    Jennifer Adams-Webb, right, CEO and co-founder for the September 11 Tribute Center, stands next to a rendering of the center's new museum, left, during a press conference, Tuesday, June 21, 2016, in New York. The Sept 11 Tribute Center, an exhibition center depicting events of 9/11, will move to a new expanded location near the World Trade Center. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)  (The Associated Press)

  • The gutted site for the new September 11 Tribute Center museum is shown during a press tour, Tuesday, June 21, 2016, in New York. The Sept 11 Tribute Center, an exhibition center depicting events of 9/11, will move to the new expanded location near the World Trade Center. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

    The gutted site for the new September 11 Tribute Center museum is shown during a press tour, Tuesday, June 21, 2016, in New York. The Sept 11 Tribute Center, an exhibition center depicting events of 9/11, will move to the new expanded location near the World Trade Center. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)  (The Associated Press)

  • Anthony Palmeri, a volunteer at the September 11 Tribute Center, tours the construction site for the center's new museum, Tuesday June 21, 2016, in New York. The Sept 11 Tribute Center, an exhibition center depicting events of 9/11, will move to a new expanded location near the World Trade Center. "Just by looking at the size of it, I think it's incredible. I am hoping that we can take our old Tribute Center and expand the meaning of what we do," said Palmeri, a sanitation worker who was a recovery worker at the 9/11 site for nine months. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

    Anthony Palmeri, a volunteer at the September 11 Tribute Center, tours the construction site for the center's new museum, Tuesday June 21, 2016, in New York. The Sept 11 Tribute Center, an exhibition center depicting events of 9/11, will move to a new expanded location near the World Trade Center. "Just by looking at the size of it, I think it's incredible. I am hoping that we can take our old Tribute Center and expand the meaning of what we do," said Palmeri, a sanitation worker who was a recovery worker at the 9/11 site for nine months. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)  (The Associated Press)

A small memorial that's been hosting tours led by volunteers with personal ties to the Sept. 11 attacks is moving and expanding.

The privately-funded Sept. 11 Tribute Center is currently housed on the site of a former deli that was just feet from one of the collapsed towers. By spring 2017, the center plans to reopen a few blocks away in a 40,000-square-foot space.

Years before the National September 11 Memorial & Museum opened, artifacts from the attack and recorded memories were kept at the Tribute Center.

About 800 volunteer guides now take visitors on walking tours of the 9/11 site. Some are survivors, others first responders, victims' family members and neighborhood residents.