Missouri

Resettled Syrian refugee expresses sorrow over shootings

  • Syrian refugee Ahmad Alabood gets on a bus following English class at Della Lamb Community Services in Kansas City, Mo., Monday, June 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

    Syrian refugee Ahmad Alabood gets on a bus following English class at Della Lamb Community Services in Kansas City, Mo., Monday, June 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)  (The Associated Press)

  • Syrian refugee Ahmad Alabood picks out days of the week while in English class at Della Lamb Community Services in Kansas City, Mo., Monday, June 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

    Syrian refugee Ahmad Alabood picks out days of the week while in English class at Della Lamb Community Services in Kansas City, Mo., Monday, June 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)  (The Associated Press)

  • Syrian refugee Ahmad Alabood, right, sits in the back row during English class at Della Lamb Community Services in Kansas City, Mo., Monday, June 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

    Syrian refugee Ahmad Alabood, right, sits in the back row during English class at Della Lamb Community Services in Kansas City, Mo., Monday, June 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)  (The Associated Press)

A Syrian man whose family was the first to be resettled in the U.S. as part of the new U.S. "surge" refugee program has faced several challenges since arriving in Kansas City.

But on Monday he wanted to express his sorrow over the Orlando nightclub shootings.

Ahmad Alabood, a 45-year-old former construction worker from Homs, Syria, spoke through an interpreter at a news conference at a school operated by Della Lamb Community Center, which has handled the family's resettlement since they arrived in April from Jordan.

Alabood said he feels for the families of the victims of the nightclub shootings and wants people to know the shooter doesn't represent Islam.

Alabood, his wife and five children were the first Syrians to be resettled in the U.S. under the surge program designed to resettle 10,000 Syrian refugees by Sept. 30.