The first black Greek organization at Virginia Tech University has been banned from that campus for 10 years. That's because a violent hazing incident has left one young man who was pledging the fraternity hospitalized -- and five other pledges badly shaken.

The black community has its own issues with violence that cry out for resolution.

Those five have corroborated the young man's dramatic account.

In this violent case of black-on-black crime, it appears that all black lives don't matter.

Investigators from the national headquarters of Alpha Phi Alpha, an all-black fraternity, interviewed for two hours the pledge who was beaten. He claims he was hazed from January 21 through January 26 of this year, The Roanoke Times reported. As the pledge has detailed in a letter, he and five other pledges were picked up in a parking garage on campus, blindfolded, and taken to another location on the evening of January 21.

The blindfolds then were removed and the group was quizzed about fraternity history, said the pledge. When a question was answered incorrectly by one of them, all six pledges were attacked. The process lasted until 5 a.m. and was repeated on subsequent days -- January 23, 24 and 25.

The young man was hospitalized and eventually withdrew from school, according to an executive order from the fraternity demanding that the Virginia Tech chapter disband, the Times reported.

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The five other pledges backed the young man's statement. LifeZette reached out to the Virginia Tech campus police about the incident, but did not receive a reply back. The Times reported that the campus police told them the incident was outside of their jurisdiction.

Harry Vincent, a junior at Texas Christian University, told LifeZette of the incident at Virginia Tech, "As a member of Delta Tau Delta, it is unfathomable to see that an incident like this has occurred. This is not what brotherhood is about and Alpha Phi Alpha does not represent the Greek community in any way -- and gives their fraternities a bad name as well."

The black-on-black violence lays bare an important dynamic. Marches, rallies and other expressions of outrage by the Black Lives Matter movement ignore the elephant in the room. Angry protestors claim to be held back socially and economically by white oppressors who have turned them into targets of unfair criminalization. Yet those same protesters deflect the obvious. The black community has its own issues with violence that cry out for resolution.

"There's no reason for the establishment to fear me," reads a quote by Huey P. Newton posted on the Black Lives Matter website. "But it has every right to fear the people collectively -- I am one with the people." Unless you are pledging Alpha Phi Alpha and representing your race in the Greek community, it seems. Then, it's every black man for himself.

These new protesters appear to do nothing to quell violence, but instead incite it. They seem unconcerned about the violence in their own race community.

The Black Lives Matter website does not offer phone numbers for leadership or members, but inquiries from LifeZette through their Facebook page went unanswered, as did a request for comment to Alpha Phi Alpha's national headquarters.

The actual data shows a different side of the claims of racial injustice. Black-on-black crime is much more prevalent than police-related deaths in the black community.

Dr. Richard B. Johnson, a criminologist from the University of Toledo, examined data from both the CDC and the FBI's Supplementary Homicide Reports. He noted that an average of 4,472 black men were killed by other black men annually between January of 2009 and December of 2012.

In the same time period, 112 men were killed by both justified and unjustified police shootings.

Why hasn't the Black Lives Matter group made more of a substantive impact on the black community? It could have made incidents like the one at Virginia Tech unfathomable.

For one, the movement has largely been co-opted from Al Sharpton and others of the civil rights "old guard" by a new generation of protesters. These new protesters appear to do nothing to quell violence but instead incite it. They seem unconcerned about the violence in their own race community.

Black-on-black crime is much more prevalent than police-related deaths in the black community.

Barbara Reynolds, an ordained minister, former civil rights protestor, and member of the black community, wrote in The Washington Post, "The baby boomers who drove the success of the civil rights movement want to get behind Black Lives Matter, but the group's confrontational and divisive tactics make it difficult. In the 1960s, activists confronted white mobs and police with dignity and decorum, sometimes dressing in church clothes and kneeling in prayer during protests to make a clear distinction between who was evil and who was good."

She continued, "But at protests today, it is difficult to distinguish legitimate activists from the mob actors who burn and loot. The demonstrations are peppered with hate speech, profanity, and guys with sagging pants that show their underwear. Even if the BLM activists aren't the ones participating in the boorish language and dress, neither are they condemning it."

Alpha Phi Alpha has a proud history at Virginia Tech, according to the chapter's website. It was founded in 1973 as the first black Greek organization on campus.

But hate speech, profanity and sagging pants are not an example that young black college kids can be inspired by or led by.