EDUCATION

High copper or lead levels seen in 19 Detroit schools' water

In this image made from video, volunteers from the United Auto Workers-Ford and other volunteers unload cases of water outside Sampson-Webber Leadership Academy in Detroit on Thursday, April 14, 2016. The academy is one of 19 schools in Detroit's school district that were found to have elevated levels of lead or copper in their water. (AP Photo/Mike Householder)

In this image made from video, volunteers from the United Auto Workers-Ford and other volunteers unload cases of water outside Sampson-Webber Leadership Academy in Detroit on Thursday, April 14, 2016. The academy is one of 19 schools in Detroit's school district that were found to have elevated levels of lead or copper in their water. (AP Photo/Mike Householder)  (The Associated Press)

Detroit Public Schools officials say elevated lead or copper levels have been found in the water in 19 schools amid ongoing testing at schools around the country in response to the crisis in nearby Flint.

The Detroit district began collecting water samples two weeks ago. District spokeswoman Michelle Zdrodowski said then that a number of factors, including the lead-tainted water crisis in Flint, led to "proactive and precautionary" testing.

Officials say that 19 of the 62 buildings tested so far showed elevated lead or copper levels. The district didn't release specifics about the levels found.

The district says it is working to fix the problems and is providing bottled water. Families have been notified.

Lead is a neurotoxin that can damage child brain development, cause behavioral problems and sicken adults.