US

With nerves frayed over faith, race and guns, an attack on Muslims leaves an unexpected legacy

  • In this Dec. 9, 2015 photo, Namee Barakat, left foreground, and his brother-in-law, Mohammad Abu-Salha, right, chat with relatives during dinner at the Barakat home in Raleigh, N.C. The two families were united in tragedy when Barakat's son and Ab-Salha's two daughters were gunned down by a disgruntled neighbor last February. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

    In this Dec. 9, 2015 photo, Namee Barakat, left foreground, and his brother-in-law, Mohammad Abu-Salha, right, chat with relatives during dinner at the Barakat home in Raleigh, N.C. The two families were united in tragedy when Barakat's son and Ab-Salha's two daughters were gunned down by a disgruntled neighbor last February. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Dec. 9, 2015 photo, Namee Barakat, left, poses with his son Farris Barakat, during a dinner at the family home in Raleigh, N.C. His younger son, Deah, was gunned down in February by a disgruntled neighbor, along with his daughter-in-law and her sister. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

    In this Dec. 9, 2015 photo, Namee Barakat, left, poses with his son Farris Barakat, during a dinner at the family home in Raleigh, N.C. His younger son, Deah, was gunned down in February by a disgruntled neighbor, along with his daughter-in-law and her sister. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Dec. 9, 2015 photo, Farris Barakat talks with his cousin, Ameer Bamyeh, left, during a family dinner at the Barakat home in Raleigh, N.C. When Barakat asked the boy what he thought of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's plan to bar most Muslims entering the country, Ameer replied: "I like Obama better." (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

    In this Dec. 9, 2015 photo, Farris Barakat talks with his cousin, Ameer Bamyeh, left, during a family dinner at the Barakat home in Raleigh, N.C. When Barakat asked the boy what he thought of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's plan to bar most Muslims entering the country, Ameer replied: "I like Obama better." (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)  (The Associated Press)

Relatives of three young Muslims who were killed in North Carolina earlier this year are honoring their memories through charity.

Deah Barakat, his wife Yusor, and her sister Razan were shot dead in their apartment near the University of North Carolina. A white neighbor who has expressed disdain for all religions is charged with murder.

Barakat and his wife had planned to travel to Turkey to help Syrian refugees get dental care. His father and brother wound up carrying on that work by staging a clinic that treated 800 refugees.

College scholarships also have been created to honor the three victims.

Barakat's brother, Farris, says the work is in keeping with a concept in Islam known as continuous charity. It's the notion that a person's good deeds can outlive them.