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Pharma's bad boy: Livestreaming, rap-loving CEO Martin Shkreli faces fraud charges

  • Martin Shkreli, center, leaves the courthouse after his arraignment in New York, Thursday, Dec. 17, 2015. Shkreli, the former hedge fund manager vilified in nearly every corner of America for buying a pharmaceutical company and jacking up the price of a life-saving drug more than fiftyfold, was arrested Thursday on securities fraud charges unrelated to the furor. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    Martin Shkreli, center, leaves the courthouse after his arraignment in New York, Thursday, Dec. 17, 2015. Shkreli, the former hedge fund manager vilified in nearly every corner of America for buying a pharmaceutical company and jacking up the price of a life-saving drug more than fiftyfold, was arrested Thursday on securities fraud charges unrelated to the furor. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)  (The Associated Press)

  • Martin Shkreli leaves the courthouse after his arraignment in New York, Thursday, Dec. 17, 2015. Shkreli, the former hedge fund manager vilified in nearly every corner of America for buying a pharmaceutical company and jacking up the price of a life-saving drug more than fiftyfold, was arrested Thursday on securities fraud charges unrelated to the furor. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    Martin Shkreli leaves the courthouse after his arraignment in New York, Thursday, Dec. 17, 2015. Shkreli, the former hedge fund manager vilified in nearly every corner of America for buying a pharmaceutical company and jacking up the price of a life-saving drug more than fiftyfold, was arrested Thursday on securities fraud charges unrelated to the furor. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)  (The Associated Press)

He's the enfant terrible of pharmaceuticals. He's a millionaire music fan who riled rap aficionados by buying the only known copy of an album by the Wu-Tang Clan. He's an unabashed self-promoter who livestreams his daily life and boasts he's "the world's most eligible bachelor."

Now, prosecutors say Martin Shkreli is a fraudster whose deceit has spanned hedge funds and drug companies.

And he's only 32.

Shkreli pleaded not guilty Thursday.

The criminal charges are unrelated to the events that made him a flashpoint this year. That's when his Turing Pharmaceuticals raised the price of the only approved drug for a rare parasitic disease from $13.50 to $750 per pill.

The charges concern a drug company and hedge funds he previously ran.