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The Latest in Gray case: Lawyers, judge gather in chambers; possible retrial to be discussed

  • Jazmin Holloway sits below a mural depicting Freddie Gray at the intersection of his arrest, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015, in Baltimore. The first effort to find a police officer criminally responsible for Freddie Gray's death from a broken neck in a police van ended Wednesday with a hung jury and a mistrial. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

    Jazmin Holloway sits below a mural depicting Freddie Gray at the intersection of his arrest, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015, in Baltimore. The first effort to find a police officer criminally responsible for Freddie Gray's death from a broken neck in a police van ended Wednesday with a hung jury and a mistrial. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)  (The Associated Press)

  • A demonstrator is detained outside of the courthouse after a mistrial of Officer William Porter, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015, in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

    A demonstrator is detained outside of the courthouse after a mistrial of Officer William Porter, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015, in Baltimore. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)  (The Associated Press)

  • Officer William Porter, right, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, walks into a courthouse during jury deliberations, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015, in Baltimore. Jurors failed to reach a verdict in the case and the judge declared a mistrial.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

    Officer William Porter, right, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, walks into a courthouse during jury deliberations, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015, in Baltimore. Jurors failed to reach a verdict in the case and the judge declared a mistrial. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)  (The Associated Press)

The latest on the mistrial for a Baltimore police officer charged with manslaughter in the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who was injured in the back of a police transport van (all times local).

10 a.m.

After a mistrial was declared in the first trial over Freddie Gray's death, lawyers on both sides are gathering in the judge chambers, where they are scheduled to discuss dates for a possible retrial.

The lawyers were seen Thursday morning at the chambers of Circuit Judge Barry Williams. A uniformed deputy is stationed outside Williams' office door.

Williams on Wednesday declared a mistrial in police Officer William Porter's case. Jurors had reported that they were deadlocked.

Porter is one of six officers charged in Gray's death. Gray's neck was broken in the back of a police transport van in April. His trial lasted a little more than two weeks.

The jury took three days to deliberate on the charges of manslaughter, assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office.

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4:45 a.m.

Baltimore has for months braced for a dramatic verdict in a case of alleged police abuse that shook its residents to the core. That verdict never came.

Instead, Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams on Wednesday declared a mistrial in the case of William Porter after jurors made it clear they were hopelessly deadlocked. The ruling puts prosecutors, defense attorneys and a populace anxious for a resolution back at square one.

Lawyers will meet in the judge's chambers Thursday to discuss dates for a possible retrial.

Porter is one of six officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray, whose neck was broken in the back of a police transport van in April. His trial lasted a little more than two weeks.

The jury took three days to deliberate on the charges of manslaughter, assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office. But after roughly 16 hours, they told Williams that a unanimous verdict was impossible.