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Kids and elders making oral history with StoryCorps' Great Thanksgiving Listen project

  • In this Oct. 11, 2015, photo, provided by Michele Gange Bonner, Lauren Bonner, center, poses between her grandparents Camille and Claude Gange at Paradox Lake, N.Y. Lauren, 13, interviewed her grandparents ahead of the StoryCorps Great Thanksgiving Listen oral history project. (Michele Gange Bonner via AP)

    In this Oct. 11, 2015, photo, provided by Michele Gange Bonner, Lauren Bonner, center, poses between her grandparents Camille and Claude Gange at Paradox Lake, N.Y. Lauren, 13, interviewed her grandparents ahead of the StoryCorps Great Thanksgiving Listen oral history project. (Michele Gange Bonner via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this photo provided by Annabelle Tipps, Annabelle and her mother, Deborah, pose for a selfie on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, at their home in Henderson, Texas. Annabelle interviewed her mother ahead of StoryCorps’ Great Thanksgiving Listen oral history project. (Annabelle Tipps via AP)

    In this photo provided by Annabelle Tipps, Annabelle and her mother, Deborah, pose for a selfie on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, at their home in Henderson, Texas. Annabelle interviewed her mother ahead of StoryCorps’ Great Thanksgiving Listen oral history project. (Annabelle Tipps via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Vanyce Grant poses with her grandfather Bernie Stuart at her home in Bolingbrook, Ill., on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015. Grant interviewed Stuart for StoryCorps' Great Thanksgiving Listen oral history project. High school students across the country are making history this weekend by recording interviews with their elders in an unprecedented effort to stockpile wisdom for the ages.  (AP Photo/Sophia Tareen)

    Vanyce Grant poses with her grandfather Bernie Stuart at her home in Bolingbrook, Ill., on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015. Grant interviewed Stuart for StoryCorps' Great Thanksgiving Listen oral history project. High school students across the country are making history this weekend by recording interviews with their elders in an unprecedented effort to stockpile wisdom for the ages. (AP Photo/Sophia Tareen)  (The Associated Press)

High school students across the country are making history this weekend by recording interviews with their elders in an unprecedented effort to stockpile wisdom for the ages.

The Great Thanksgiving Listen was conceived by leaders of the nonprofit oral history project StoryCorps. They're encouraging kids to send their audio recordings to a Library of Congress archive, using a free smartphone app from the StoryCorps website.

StoryCorps president and founder Dave Isay (EYE'-say) calls it a unifying moment. He hopes to double, in one weekend, the 65,000 audio recordings that StoryCorps has collected since 2003.

Isay says StoryCorps workers will sift through the results to find compelling stories to share. But he says every interview is a gift to future generations.