Illinois

The Latest: Federal authorities say they're still investigating the McDonald shooting

  • Protesters block rush hour traffic along the Michigan Ave. bridge over the Chicago River Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, in Chicago, the day after murder charges were brought against police officer Jason Van Dyke in the killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    Protesters block rush hour traffic along the Michigan Ave. bridge over the Chicago River Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, in Chicago, the day after murder charges were brought against police officer Jason Van Dyke in the killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)  (The Associated Press)

  • A protester is silhouetted against Chicago's famed Wrigley Building as he directs others to shutdown traffic on both sides of the Michigan Ave. bridge over the Chicago River, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, one day after murder charges were brought against police officer Jason Van Dyke in the killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

    A protester is silhouetted against Chicago's famed Wrigley Building as he directs others to shutdown traffic on both sides of the Michigan Ave. bridge over the Chicago River, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015, one day after murder charges were brought against police officer Jason Van Dyke in the killing of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)  (The Associated Press)

  • Chicago police scuffle with protesters in Chicago, on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (Nuccio DiNuzzo/Chicago Tribune via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT CHICAGO TRIBUNE; CHICAGO SUN-TIMES OUT; DAILY HERALD OUT; NORTHWEST HERALD OUT; THE HERALD-NEWS OUT; DAILY CHRONICLE OUT; THE TIMES OF NORTHWEST INDIANA OUT; TV OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES

    Chicago police scuffle with protesters in Chicago, on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015. White Officer Jason Van Dyke, who shot Laquan McDonald 16 times last year, was charged with first-degree murder Tuesday, hours before the city released a video of the killing. (Nuccio DiNuzzo/Chicago Tribune via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT CHICAGO TRIBUNE; CHICAGO SUN-TIMES OUT; DAILY HERALD OUT; NORTHWEST HERALD OUT; THE HERALD-NEWS OUT; DAILY CHRONICLE OUT; THE TIMES OF NORTHWEST INDIANA OUT; TV OUT; MAGS OUT; NO SALES  (The Associated Press)

The latest on the aftermath of the shooting of a black teenager by a white Chicago police officer (all times local):

8:05 a.m.

Federal authorities say they're still investigating the fatal shooting of black teenager Laquan McDonald by a white Chicago police officer last year.

The Wednesday night news release from the U.S. Attorney's office comes after Cook County prosecutors charged Officer Jason Van Dyke with first-degree murder in the death of the 17-year-old McDonald, whom he shot 16 times. City officials released the police dashcam video of the shooting on Tuesday.

Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez said Tuesday she'd hoped to make a joint announcement with federal authorities about charges against Van Dyke but decided to charge him earlier in the hopes of calming what she knew would be an angry response to the video.

Experts have said that Van Dyke could be also charged with violating McDonald's civil rights.

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7:45 a.m.

Officials of Chicago Public Schools say they're preparing for the fallout resulting from the video showing a police officer shooting 17-year-old Laquan McDonald.

The Chicago Tribune reports (http://trib.in/1IhGV0f ) that parents have received a letter from Chief Education Officer Janice Jackson assuring them the video won't be shown in schools. Jackson also said it is likely students will discuss the video when they return to classrooms Monday.

A six-page "tool kit" was distributed to teachers with exercises designed to help them and their students deal with McDonald's death and the murder charges filed against Officer Jason Van Dyke.

Teachers union official Jesse Sharkey criticizes the kid for not including a "lesson about the lack of political courage" and "political corruption."