In stories from Aug. 11 to Aug. 20 about the trial of a white police officer charged in the killing of an unarmed black man, The Associated Press reported erroneously the name of the judge overseeing the case. The judge's name is Robert Ervin, not Richard Ervin.

A corrected version of the story is below:

The Latest: Jury adjourns for day in police officer's trial

The Latest: Jury adjourns without verdict in police officer's voluntary manslaughter trial

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — The latest on the trial of a white Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer charged with voluntary manslaughter in the shooting death of an unarmed black man seeking help after a September 2013 car crash (all times local):

5 p.m.

Deliberations have ended for the day without a verdict in the trial of a white Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer accused in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man has ended.

The racially diverse jury of eight women and four men began their talks around 2:40 p.m. Tuesday after Judge Robert C. Ervin read to them the elements of voluntary manslaughter, the charge Officer Randall Kerrick is facing.

At 4:55 p.m., Ervin asked the jury foreman of the panel was ready to take a break for the day, and the foreman said yes.

The first full day of deliberations for the jury is scheduled for Wednesday.

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3:15 p.m.

The jury considering the case of a white Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer accused in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man has asked the judge to read them the elements of voluntary manslaughter.

The request came just after jurors returned from their lunch break Tuesday. They were about to begin their deliberations in the trial of suspended Officer Randall Kerrick, who is charged in the death of Jonathan Ferrell nearly two years ago.

Judge Robert C. Ervin read the elements, which include whether Kerrick killed Ferrell intentionally and unlawfully.

After Ervin read the elements, which he had given the jury earlier in his instructions, the eight woman and four men returned to the jury room to start their deliberations.

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12:45 p.m.

Attorneys have finished their closing arguments in the case of a white Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer accused in the shooting death of an unarmed black man almost two years ago.

Defense attorney George Laughrun presented the jury with a slide show Tuesday. He used the same TV screen that was used to show dashcam video that recorded the final moments before Officer Randall Kerrick shot Jonathan Ferrell in September 2013. The slides ranged from a list of Kerrick's character traits to a picture of Lady Liberty.

Prosecutor Teresa Postell countered Laughrun's claim that the state had failed to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Kerrick used excessive force in shooting Ferrell, arguing that Kerrick changed his story about Ferrell reaching behind his back prior to charging at him.

Judge Robert C. Ervin gave instructions to the jury of eight women and four men. Deliberations are expected to begin after a lunch break.

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11 a.m.

Attorneys cited everything from the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. to the Bible in their closing arguments in the trial of a white Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer charged with killing an unarmed black man.

Officer Randall Kerrick is charged with voluntary manslaughter in the September 2013 shooting death of Jonathan Ferrell, a former Florida A&M football player.

A jury that appears to be racially diverse, with eight women and four men, will decide Kerrick's fate.

Prosecutor Adren Harris invoked King's name in suggesting Kerrick didn't tell the truth about what happened in the shooting.

Defense attorney George Laughrun cited the 106th Psalm, and related it to police officers and their work.

Both sides used dashcam video played several times throughout the trial to make their case one more time.

A line of about 50 spectators formed outside the courtroom prior to the arguments, packing the courtroom.