DISASTERS

New hole opens in ground at site of fatal Florida sinkhole that swallowed sleeping man in 2013

  • Ron Spiller, director of code enforcement for Hillsborough County, center, behind microphones, addresses the media in front of where a sinkhole reopened, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015, in Seffner, Fla. The sinkhole reopened in the exact same location where one swallowed a man as he slept in his bed more than two years ago.  The new hole is 17 feet wide by 20 feet deep, according to Spiller.   (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

    Ron Spiller, director of code enforcement for Hillsborough County, center, behind microphones, addresses the media in front of where a sinkhole reopened, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015, in Seffner, Fla. The sinkhole reopened in the exact same location where one swallowed a man as he slept in his bed more than two years ago. The new hole is 17 feet wide by 20 feet deep, according to Spiller. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)  (The Associated Press)

  • Jeremy Bush watches as members of the Hillsborough County Code Enforcement survey the property where a sinkhole reopened, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015, in Seffner, Fla. The sinkhole reopened in the exact same location where one swallowed Jeremy's brother Jeffrey Bush, as he slept in his bed more than two years ago.  The new hole is 17 feet wide by 20 feet deep, according to code enforcement director Ron Spiller.  In March 2013, Jeffrey Bush was asleep in his bedroom on the property when the floor collapsed and he fell in. His body was never recovered. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

    Jeremy Bush watches as members of the Hillsborough County Code Enforcement survey the property where a sinkhole reopened, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015, in Seffner, Fla. The sinkhole reopened in the exact same location where one swallowed Jeremy's brother Jeffrey Bush, as he slept in his bed more than two years ago. The new hole is 17 feet wide by 20 feet deep, according to code enforcement director Ron Spiller. In March 2013, Jeffrey Bush was asleep in his bedroom on the property when the floor collapsed and he fell in. His body was never recovered. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)  (The Associated Press)

  • Ron Spiller, director of code enforcement for Hillsborough County, center, surveys the property where a sinkhole reopened, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015, in Seffner, Fla. The sinkhole reopened in the exact same location where one swallowed a man as he slept in his bed more than two years ago.  The new hole is 17 feet wide by 20 feet deep, according to Spiller.  In March 2013, Jeffrey Bush was asleep in his bedroom on the property when the floor collapsed and he fell in. His body was never recovered. His brother, Jeremy Bush, was in the house and tried to rescue him, even jumping into the hole. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

    Ron Spiller, director of code enforcement for Hillsborough County, center, surveys the property where a sinkhole reopened, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015, in Seffner, Fla. The sinkhole reopened in the exact same location where one swallowed a man as he slept in his bed more than two years ago. The new hole is 17 feet wide by 20 feet deep, according to Spiller. In March 2013, Jeffrey Bush was asleep in his bedroom on the property when the floor collapsed and he fell in. His body was never recovered. His brother, Jeremy Bush, was in the house and tried to rescue him, even jumping into the hole. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)  (The Associated Press)

Another sinkhole opened Wednesday in the exact location where one swallowed a man as he slept in his bed more than two years ago, Florida emergency responders said.

The hole opened up again in Seffner, east of Tampa, and is about 20 feet in diameter, Ronnie Rivera of Hillsborough County Fire Rescue said.

In March 2013, Jeffrey Bush was asleep in his bedroom on the property when the floor collapsed and he fell in. His body was never recovered. His brother, Jeremy Bush, was in the house and tried to rescue him, even jumping into the hole. He was rescued by authorities as the ground crumbled around him.

Officials then razed the home and two adjacent homes. Wednesday's sinkhole is on a vacant lot that's now surrounded by a metal fence.

No one has been injured from the new sinkhole, and no nearby homes have been evacuated, Rivera said.

Sinkholes are so common in Florida that state law requires home insurers to provide coverage against the danger. While some cars, homes and other buildings have been devoured, it's rare for them to swallow a person.

Florida is highly prone to sinkholes because there are caverns below ground of limestone, a porous rock that easily dissolves in water.