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The Latest: EPA administrator to visit New Mexico, Colorado to see impacts of mine spill

  • In this aerial photo taken Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, waste water continues to stream out of the Gold King Mine near Silverton, Colo. Frustration is mounting throughout the Four Corners region among officials and residents who say the EPA has moved too slowly and hasn't been forthcoming about the dangers of the spill. (Geoff Liesik/The Deseret News via AP)  SALT LAKE TRIBUNE OUT; MAGS OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT   MBO (REV-SHARE)

    In this aerial photo taken Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015, waste water continues to stream out of the Gold King Mine near Silverton, Colo. Frustration is mounting throughout the Four Corners region among officials and residents who say the EPA has moved too slowly and hasn't been forthcoming about the dangers of the spill. (Geoff Liesik/The Deseret News via AP) SALT LAKE TRIBUNE OUT; MAGS OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT MBO (REV-SHARE)  (The Associated Press)

  • Water flows through a series of retention ponds built to contain and filter out heavy metals and chemicals from the Gold King mine wastewater accident, in the spillway about 1/4 mile downstream from the mine, outside Silverton, Colo., Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015. The Environmental Protection Agency has taken full responsibility for the mine waste spoiling rivers downstream from Silverton, but people who live near the idled and leaking Gold King mine say local authorities and mining companies spent decades spurning federal cleanup help. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Water flows through a series of retention ponds built to contain and filter out heavy metals and chemicals from the Gold King mine wastewater accident, in the spillway about 1/4 mile downstream from the mine, outside Silverton, Colo., Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015. The Environmental Protection Agency has taken full responsibility for the mine waste spoiling rivers downstream from Silverton, but people who live near the idled and leaking Gold King mine say local authorities and mining companies spent decades spurning federal cleanup help. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)  (The Associated Press)

  • Water flows through one in a series of retention ponds built to contain and filter out heavy metals and chemicals from the Gold King mine wastewater accident, in the spillway about 1/4 mile downstream from the mine, outside Silverton, Colo., Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015. The Environmental Protection Agency has taken full responsibility for the mine waste spoiling rivers downstream from Silverton, but people who live near the idled and leaking Gold King mine say local authorities and mining companies spent decades spurning federal cleanup help. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Water flows through one in a series of retention ponds built to contain and filter out heavy metals and chemicals from the Gold King mine wastewater accident, in the spillway about 1/4 mile downstream from the mine, outside Silverton, Colo., Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015. The Environmental Protection Agency has taken full responsibility for the mine waste spoiling rivers downstream from Silverton, but people who live near the idled and leaking Gold King mine say local authorities and mining companies spent decades spurning federal cleanup help. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)  (The Associated Press)

The latest in the Colorado mine spill (all times local):

7:35 a.m.

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency plans to visit Colorado and New Mexico sometime Wednesday to see the impact of a 3 million gallon mine waste spill triggered during an agency-led cleanup.

EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy says the spill that turned part of the Animas River in Colorado a shade of mustardy yellow last week "pains me to no end" and her department takes full responsibility.

The pollution washed down the river and is believed to have passed into Utah but it's difficult to detect because it has been diluted and no longer has the bright color.

The EPA has said the current flows are too fast for the contaminants to pose an immediate health threat, and that the heavy metals will likely be diluted over time so they don't pose a longer-term threat, either.