RELIGION

End of ban prompts some gays to rejoin Boy Scouts as leaders; Mormon church considers a split

  • In this Sunday, June 28, 2015 photo provided by Chris Zelis, Scouts For Equality - Chicago chapter members serve as the color guard for the Chicago Pride Parade. The lifting of the Boy Scouts of America's ban on gay adult leaders prompted some gay Eagle Scouts to quickly rejoin the movement on Tuesday, July 28, 2015. (Chris Zelis via AP)

    In this Sunday, June 28, 2015 photo provided by Chris Zelis, Scouts For Equality - Chicago chapter members serve as the color guard for the Chicago Pride Parade. The lifting of the Boy Scouts of America's ban on gay adult leaders prompted some gay Eagle Scouts to quickly rejoin the movement on Tuesday, July 28, 2015. (Chris Zelis via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • This 2015 photo provided by John S. Adcock shows Jeff Spain and his father Charles Spain in Houston before leaving for Scout summer camp. Charles Spain, a 56-year-old attorney, had not worn a Scout uniform since his post-college years as an in-the-closet Scout employee before he entered law school. On Tuesday morning, July 28, 2015, he registered as an adult leader with the local Scout troop that his 13-year-old son belongs to. (John S. Adcock via AP)

    This 2015 photo provided by John S. Adcock shows Jeff Spain and his father Charles Spain in Houston before leaving for Scout summer camp. Charles Spain, a 56-year-old attorney, had not worn a Scout uniform since his post-college years as an in-the-closet Scout employee before he entered law school. On Tuesday morning, July 28, 2015, he registered as an adult leader with the local Scout troop that his 13-year-old son belongs to. (John S. Adcock via AP)  (The Associated Press)

The lifting of the Boy Scouts of America's ban on gay adult leaders prompted some gay Eagle Scouts to quickly rejoin the movement on Tuesday. But the Mormon church — the nation's largest sponsor of Scout units — warned that it may split away to form a global scouting organization of its own.

Mormon officials described the admission of openly gay leaders as "inconsistent with the doctrines of the Church."

The contrasting reactions followed the BSA national executive board's 45-12 vote on Monday to lift the nationwide ban while allowing church-sponsored units to continue excluding gay adults.

Across the country, scores of gay Eagle Scouts signed forms with the advocacy group Scouts for Equality, expressing interest in rejoining the Boy Scouts as volunteers.