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The Latest: Sharpton weighs in on chokehold death settlement, says 'Money is not justice'

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio pauses as he speaks during a memorial service for Eric Garner at the Mount Sinai United Christian Church in the Staten Island borough of New York Tuesday, July 14, 2015, just short of a year after Garner died while being taken into custody by New York City police officers. A $5.9 million settlement in Garner's death, a black man who died after being placed in a white police officer's chokehold, was reached with the city this week, days before the anniversary of his death. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio pauses as he speaks during a memorial service for Eric Garner at the Mount Sinai United Christian Church in the Staten Island borough of New York Tuesday, July 14, 2015, just short of a year after Garner died while being taken into custody by New York City police officers. A $5.9 million settlement in Garner's death, a black man who died after being placed in a white police officer's chokehold, was reached with the city this week, days before the anniversary of his death. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)  (The Associated Press)

The latest on the settlement between New York City and the family of a black man who died after being placed in a white police officer's chokehold (all times local):

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11:45 a.m.

The Rev. Al Sharpton says New York City's $5.9 million settlement with the family of an unarmed black man killed after being put in a white police officer's chokehold recognizes the relatives' loss, but he says "money is not justice."

Sharpton spoke Tuesday, a day after the settlement with Eric Garner's family was announced. It comes almost a year after the 43-year-old's death. A grand jury later declined to indict Officer Daniel Pantaleo.

Sharpton says the financial settlement "does not deal with the criminal and other wrongs done to this family and other families."

Garner's death and police killings of other unarmed black men fueled widespread protests. Sharpton says Garner's videotaped gasps of "I can't breathe!" helped spur a national movement that won't end "until we change how policing goes."