CRIME

Defense in Colorado theater shooting rests after trying to show gunman was insane

  • In this image taken from video, accused Colorado theater shooter James Holmes, on the far left, watches an evidence video of himself in a jail cell during his trial, in Centennial, Colo., Friday, July 10, 2015. Holmes is in the center of the video under a blanket after being covered by the officers surrounding him. Holmes has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to killing 12 people and injuring 70 others in the July 2012 shooting at a suburban Denver movie theater. (Colorado Judicial Department via AP, Pool)

    In this image taken from video, accused Colorado theater shooter James Holmes, on the far left, watches an evidence video of himself in a jail cell during his trial, in Centennial, Colo., Friday, July 10, 2015. Holmes is in the center of the video under a blanket after being covered by the officers surrounding him. Holmes has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to killing 12 people and injuring 70 others in the July 2012 shooting at a suburban Denver movie theater. (Colorado Judicial Department via AP, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this image taken from Colorado Judicial Department video, Colorado theater shooter James Holmes, upper left in blue shirt, joins others in standing as the jury, not pictured, is brought into the courtroom, during Holmes' trial in Centennial, Colo., Friday, July 10, 2015. The defense in the Colorado theater shooting trial rested its case Friday after trying to show James Holmes was legally insane when he carried out the deadly 2012 attack, suffering from delusions that each person he killed would increase his self-worth. (Colorado Judicial Department via AP, Pool)

    In this image taken from Colorado Judicial Department video, Colorado theater shooter James Holmes, upper left in blue shirt, joins others in standing as the jury, not pictured, is brought into the courtroom, during Holmes' trial in Centennial, Colo., Friday, July 10, 2015. The defense in the Colorado theater shooting trial rested its case Friday after trying to show James Holmes was legally insane when he carried out the deadly 2012 attack, suffering from delusions that each person he killed would increase his self-worth. (Colorado Judicial Department via AP, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

The defense in the Colorado theater shooting trial has rested after trying to show gunman James Holmes was insane at the time of the 2012 attack.

The defense wrapped up Friday after two weeks of testimony that featured a pair of psychiatrists who examined Holmes and found that he was insane.

Earlier in the case, two court-appointed doctors testified for the prosecution that Holmes knew the difference between right and wrong at the time of the killings and therefore was sane under Colorado law.

In Colorado, prosecutors have the burden of proof in insanity cases. So the defense only needed to raise a reasonable doubt that Holmes was sane.

His attorneys argued he was in the grips of a psychotic episode during the attack that killed 12 and injured 70. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty.