EDUCATION

Novelist loses sailboat but saves marriage on failed Atlantic crossing

  • Michael Hurley, a South Carolina author who lost his storm-battered sailboat on a failed Atlantic crossing, left, poses for a photo with Maine Maritime Academy junior Gabrielle Wells on the stern of the training vessel State of Maine, Saturday, June 13, 2015, in Portland, Maine. Wells was student officer of the deck when Hurley’s distress call was received Wednesday, leading to Hurley’s rescue around 500 miles south of Newfoundland. (AP Photo/David Sharp)

    Michael Hurley, a South Carolina author who lost his storm-battered sailboat on a failed Atlantic crossing, left, poses for a photo with Maine Maritime Academy junior Gabrielle Wells on the stern of the training vessel State of Maine, Saturday, June 13, 2015, in Portland, Maine. Wells was student officer of the deck when Hurley’s distress call was received Wednesday, leading to Hurley’s rescue around 500 miles south of Newfoundland. (AP Photo/David Sharp)  (The Associated Press)

  • Michael Hurley, a South Carolina author who lost his storm-battered sailboat on a failed Atlantic crossing, poses for a photo on the stern of the Maine Maritime Academy training vessel Saturday, June 13, 2015, in Portland, Maine. Hurley was rescued Wednesday some 500 miles south of Newfoundland by students aboard the State of Maine, which arrived Saturday in Portland Harbor. (AP Photo/David Sharp)

    Michael Hurley, a South Carolina author who lost his storm-battered sailboat on a failed Atlantic crossing, poses for a photo on the stern of the Maine Maritime Academy training vessel Saturday, June 13, 2015, in Portland, Maine. Hurley was rescued Wednesday some 500 miles south of Newfoundland by students aboard the State of Maine, which arrived Saturday in Portland Harbor. (AP Photo/David Sharp)  (The Associated Press)

A South Carolina writer lost his 30-foot sailboat on an Atlantic crossing but all wasn't lost. He repaired his marriage during his mishap at sea.

Michael Hurley says that three days before his rescue by students on a Maine Maritime Academy training cruise, he and his wife Susan decided to renew their vows.

Hurley arrived Saturday in Portland, Maine, aboard the 500-foot State of Maine.

The huge vessel was returning from Spain when Hurley sought help because his sailboat was taking on water south of Newfoundland. College officials say it's the first time students rescued someone on a training cruise.

Hurley says he'll soon be reunited with his wife, and they plan to go to Ireland to renew their vows.

He lives outside Charleston, South Carolina, and wrote "The Prodigal."