DISASTERS

Sex and the drought: San Francisco hopes sexy ads coax more savings from water-thrifty city

  • This image is a copy of an ad created and released by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. San Francisco is hoping racier-yet ads promoting water conservation _ like “Go Full Frontal,” for water-saving front-loading washers _ will encourage Bay Area residents to save yet more, to meet a state-mandated 10 percent cut in water use for the drought. Even with sexy public service announcements, it may be a tough sell. Bay Area residents already are among the thriftiest water users in the state, and the area’s water reservoirs are 90 percent full.  (AP Photo/San Francisco Public Utilities Commission)

    This image is a copy of an ad created and released by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. San Francisco is hoping racier-yet ads promoting water conservation _ like “Go Full Frontal,” for water-saving front-loading washers _ will encourage Bay Area residents to save yet more, to meet a state-mandated 10 percent cut in water use for the drought. Even with sexy public service announcements, it may be a tough sell. Bay Area residents already are among the thriftiest water users in the state, and the area’s water reservoirs are 90 percent full. (AP Photo/San Francisco Public Utilities Commission)  (The Associated Press)

  • This image is a copy of an ad created and released by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. San Francisco is hoping racier-yet ads promoting water conservation _ like “Go Full Frontal,” for water-saving front-loading washers _ will encourage Bay Area residents to save yet more, to meet a state-mandated 10 percent cut in water use for the drought. Even with sexy public service announcements, it may be a tough sell. Bay Area residents already are among the thriftiest water users in the state, and the area’s water reservoirs are 90 percent full.  (AP Photo/San Francisco Public Utilities Commission)

    This image is a copy of an ad created and released by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. San Francisco is hoping racier-yet ads promoting water conservation _ like “Go Full Frontal,” for water-saving front-loading washers _ will encourage Bay Area residents to save yet more, to meet a state-mandated 10 percent cut in water use for the drought. Even with sexy public service announcements, it may be a tough sell. Bay Area residents already are among the thriftiest water users in the state, and the area’s water reservoirs are 90 percent full. (AP Photo/San Francisco Public Utilities Commission)  (The Associated Press)

  • This image is a copy of an ad created and released by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. San Francisco is hoping racier-yet ads promoting water conservation _ like “Go Full Frontal,” for water-saving front-loading washers _ will encourage Bay Area residents to save yet more, to meet a state-mandated 10 percent cut in water use for the drought. Even with sexy public service announcements, it may be a tough sell. Bay Area residents already are among the thriftiest water users in the state, and the area’s water reservoirs are 90 percent full.  (AP Photo/San Francisco Public Utilities Commission)

    This image is a copy of an ad created and released by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. San Francisco is hoping racier-yet ads promoting water conservation _ like “Go Full Frontal,” for water-saving front-loading washers _ will encourage Bay Area residents to save yet more, to meet a state-mandated 10 percent cut in water use for the drought. Even with sexy public service announcements, it may be a tough sell. Bay Area residents already are among the thriftiest water users in the state, and the area’s water reservoirs are 90 percent full. (AP Photo/San Francisco Public Utilities Commission)  (The Associated Press)

San Francisco Bay Area water officials are urging residents to go "full-frontal" and take short, steamy showers.

The sexy messages are contained in new public service ads intended to draw attention to the serious message of conservation.

San Francisco Public Utilities Commission spokesman Tyrone Jue said Wednesday the ads will appear on billboards, social media and TV, with the full-frontal line urging people to buy water thrifty, front-loading washing machines.

The ads are rolling out as the four-year drought drags on and the state launches mandatory 25 percent water conservation by cities and towns.

San Francisco residents use an average of just 44 gallons of water a day. By comparison, individuals in some parts of Southern California average 368 gallons.