EDUCATION

Hundreds of Syrians find a home at US universities with eye to rebuilding war-torn country

  • Syrian brothers Mohammad Kayali, left, Ebrahim Kayali, right and Molham Kayali, center, pose for a photograph on the Emporia State University campus in Emporia, Kan., Wednesday, May 6, 2015.   Tens of thousands of college students in Syria have been displaced by the long-running conflict, creating an educational vacuum that colleges around the world are increasingly seeking to fill in the hopes that the “academic refugees” will someday help rebuild their country. Brothers, Molham, Mohammad and Ebrahim Kayali all landed at Emporia State University in Kansas and are emblematic of the plight and are among the 700 Syrian students in the U.S. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

    Syrian brothers Mohammad Kayali, left, Ebrahim Kayali, right and Molham Kayali, center, pose for a photograph on the Emporia State University campus in Emporia, Kan., Wednesday, May 6, 2015. Tens of thousands of college students in Syria have been displaced by the long-running conflict, creating an educational vacuum that colleges around the world are increasingly seeking to fill in the hopes that the “academic refugees” will someday help rebuild their country. Brothers, Molham, Mohammad and Ebrahim Kayali all landed at Emporia State University in Kansas and are emblematic of the plight and are among the 700 Syrian students in the U.S. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)  (The Associated Press)

  • Syrian brothers Molham Kayali, left, Ebrahim Kayali, right and Mohammad Kayali, back, pose for a photograph on the Emporia State University campus in Emporia, Kan., Wednesday, May 6, 2015.   Tens of thousands of college students in Syria have been displaced by the long-running conflict, creating an educational vacuum that colleges around the world are increasingly seeking to fill in the hopes that the “academic refugees” will someday help rebuild their country. Brothers, Molham, Mohammad and Ebrahim Kayali all landed at Emporia State University in Kansas and are emblematic of the plight and are among the 700 Syrian students in the U.S. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

    Syrian brothers Molham Kayali, left, Ebrahim Kayali, right and Mohammad Kayali, back, pose for a photograph on the Emporia State University campus in Emporia, Kan., Wednesday, May 6, 2015. Tens of thousands of college students in Syria have been displaced by the long-running conflict, creating an educational vacuum that colleges around the world are increasingly seeking to fill in the hopes that the “academic refugees” will someday help rebuild their country. Brothers, Molham, Mohammad and Ebrahim Kayali all landed at Emporia State University in Kansas and are emblematic of the plight and are among the 700 Syrian students in the U.S. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)  (The Associated Press)

  • Syrian brothers  Ebrahim Kayali, left, Molham Kayali, right and Mohammad Kayali, back, walk together on the Emporia State University campus in Emporia, Kan., Wednesday, May 6, 2015.   Tens of thousands of college students in Syria have been displaced by the long-running conflict, creating an educational vacuum that colleges around the world are increasingly seeking to fill in the hopes that the “academic refugees” will someday help rebuild their country. Brothers, Molham, Mohammad and Ebrahim Kayali all landed at Emporia State University in Kansas and are emblematic of the plight and are among the 700 Syrian students in the U.S. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)

    Syrian brothers Ebrahim Kayali, left, Molham Kayali, right and Mohammad Kayali, back, walk together on the Emporia State University campus in Emporia, Kan., Wednesday, May 6, 2015. Tens of thousands of college students in Syria have been displaced by the long-running conflict, creating an educational vacuum that colleges around the world are increasingly seeking to fill in the hopes that the “academic refugees” will someday help rebuild their country. Brothers, Molham, Mohammad and Ebrahim Kayali all landed at Emporia State University in Kansas and are emblematic of the plight and are among the 700 Syrian students in the U.S. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)  (The Associated Press)

Tens of thousands of college students have been displaced by the long-running conflict in Syria.

That has created an educational vacuum that colleges around the world are increasingly seeking to fill in the hopes that the "academic refugees" will someday help rebuild their country.

Brothers, Molham, Mohammad and Ebrahim Kayali (KAY-ahl-eh) are emblematic of the plight and are among the 700 Syrian students in the U.S. They all landed at Emporia State University in Kansas after fleeing from Aleppo.

The nearly 6,000-student public school is part of a consortium of higher education institutions in the U.S., Portugal and England meant to help Syrian students.

Formed with the Institute of International Education's help, the consortium has helped nearly 160 displaced students with scholarships and 89 with emergency grants since 2012.