MILITARY

Senate faces extraordinary Sunday session with key Patriot Act provisions hours from expiring

  • FILE - In this April 7, 2015 file photo, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. holds up his cell phone as he speaks before announcing the start of his presidential campaign, in Louisville, Ky.  Key Patriot Act anti-terror provisions, including bulk collection of Americans’ phone records, expire at midnight unless senators come up with an 11th hour deal in an extraordinary Sunday afternoon session. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

    FILE - In this April 7, 2015 file photo, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. holds up his cell phone as he speaks before announcing the start of his presidential campaign, in Louisville, Ky. Key Patriot Act anti-terror provisions, including bulk collection of Americans’ phone records, expire at midnight unless senators come up with an 11th hour deal in an extraordinary Sunday afternoon session. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this May 19, 2015 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. pauses during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 19, 2015.  Key Patriot Act anti-terror provisions, including bulk collection of Americans’ phone records, expire at midnight unless senators come up with an 11th hour deal in an extraordinary Sunday afternoon session.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

    FILE - In this May 19, 2015 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. pauses during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Key Patriot Act anti-terror provisions, including bulk collection of Americans’ phone records, expire at midnight unless senators come up with an 11th hour deal in an extraordinary Sunday afternoon session. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)  (The Associated Press)

  • Sen. Ted Cruz., R-Texas., left, speaks with reporters as he walks to the Senate Chamber for a special session of the Senate to extend surveillance programs,  in Washington, Sunday, May 31, 2015. Senate Republicans say they've been unable to make a deal to extend contested anti-terror provisions. As a result, the post-Sept. 11 programs will expire at midnight.  (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

    Sen. Ted Cruz., R-Texas., left, speaks with reporters as he walks to the Senate Chamber for a special session of the Senate to extend surveillance programs, in Washington, Sunday, May 31, 2015. Senate Republicans say they've been unable to make a deal to extend contested anti-terror provisions. As a result, the post-Sept. 11 programs will expire at midnight. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)  (The Associated Press)

Key Patriot Act anti-terror provisions, including bulk collection of Americans' phone records, expire at midnight unless senators come up with an 11th hour deal in an extraordinary Sunday afternoon session.

Chances for that look all but nonexistent. Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, who is running for president, vowed Saturday to force the bulk phone collection program to expire. And the Senate's complex rules allow him to do just that — at least temporarily.

A House-passed bill backed by the White House that remakes the National Security Agency phone collection program is just three votes short in the Senate. But even if it picks up the needed support despite opposition from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, moving to a final vote requires the assent of all senators.