MILITARY

Fatal military air crash in Hawaii renews protests in Japan over deployment of more Ospreys

  • FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2014 file photo, Japan Self-Defense Forces personnel stand guard an MV-22 Osprey during the annual Self-Defense Forces Commencement of Air Review at Hyakuri Air Base, north of Tokyo.  A fatal crash of a U.S. Marine Corps aircraft in Hawaii has renewed safety concerns in Japan, where more of the Ospreys will be deployed. A tilt-rotor MV-22 Osprey caught fire after a hard landing on Sunday, May 17, 2015, killing one Marine and injuring 21 others at Bellows Air Force Station on Hawaii’s main island of Oahu. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2014 file photo, Japan Self-Defense Forces personnel stand guard an MV-22 Osprey during the annual Self-Defense Forces Commencement of Air Review at Hyakuri Air Base, north of Tokyo. A fatal crash of a U.S. Marine Corps aircraft in Hawaii has renewed safety concerns in Japan, where more of the Ospreys will be deployed. A tilt-rotor MV-22 Osprey caught fire after a hard landing on Sunday, May 17, 2015, killing one Marine and injuring 21 others at Bellows Air Force Station on Hawaii’s main island of Oahu. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this April 22, 2015 photo, a Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey comes in for a landing at Miami International Airport before a presidential visit, in Miami. A fatal crash of a U.S. Marine Corps aircraft in Hawaii has renewed safety concerns in Japan, where more of the Ospreys will be deployed. A tilt-rotor MV-22 Osprey caught fire after a hard landing on Sunday, May 17, 2015, killing one Marine and injuring 21 others at Bellows Air Force Station on Hawaii’s main island of Oahu. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    In this April 22, 2015 photo, a Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey comes in for a landing at Miami International Airport before a presidential visit, in Miami. A fatal crash of a U.S. Marine Corps aircraft in Hawaii has renewed safety concerns in Japan, where more of the Ospreys will be deployed. A tilt-rotor MV-22 Osprey caught fire after a hard landing on Sunday, May 17, 2015, killing one Marine and injuring 21 others at Bellows Air Force Station on Hawaii’s main island of Oahu. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)  (The Associated Press)

A fatal crash of a U.S. Marine Corps aircraft in Hawaii has renewed safety concerns in Japan, where more of the Ospreys will be deployed.

Gov. Takeshi Onaga on the southern island of Okinawa says flights of the hybrid aircraft should be suspended until the cause of the crash is found.

A tilt-rotor MV-22 Osprey caught fire after a hard landing on Sunday, killing one Marine and injuring 21 others at Bellows Air Force Station on Hawaii's main island of Oahu.

The U.S. operates 24 Ospreys on Okinawa and announced a week ago that 10 more would be deployed to a base near Tokyo beginning in 2017.

The U.S. military says the Osprey is safe but Okinawans have worried the aircraft may be prone to crashes.