DISASTERS

Plains states on alert for another burst of severe weather; tornadoes, large hail possible

  • Texas A&M softball fans take refuge in a classroom at the Oklahoma University Law Center after game play was suspended in the third inning of an NCAA college softball tournament regional game due to severe weather, Saturday, May 16, 2015, in Norman, Okla. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)

    Texas A&M softball fans take refuge in a classroom at the Oklahoma University Law Center after game play was suspended in the third inning of an NCAA college softball tournament regional game due to severe weather, Saturday, May 16, 2015, in Norman, Okla. (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)  (The Associated Press)

  • The forecast for noon, Sunday, May 17, 2015 shows a complex storm system will trigger showers and storms from the Gulf Coast to the Midwest. Storms could become severe through the Iowa, Minnesota, Illinois, and Wisconsin. Scattered afternoon storms are possible through the Rockies and parts of the West. (Weather Underground via AP)

    The forecast for noon, Sunday, May 17, 2015 shows a complex storm system will trigger showers and storms from the Gulf Coast to the Midwest. Storms could become severe through the Iowa, Minnesota, Illinois, and Wisconsin. Scattered afternoon storms are possible through the Rockies and parts of the West. (Weather Underground via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • Carol Cole stands in her home in Broken Arrow, Okla., on Sunday, May 17, 2015, after a strong storm hit the area Saturday night and early Sunday morning, destroying the Cole's home. Dangerous weather was centered in southwestern Oklahoma, where tornadoes touched down near Elmer and Tipton, National Weather Service forecaster Daryl Williams said. The most significant damage, according to Oklahoma emergency officials, was to homes, businesses and power lines. (Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP)

    Carol Cole stands in her home in Broken Arrow, Okla., on Sunday, May 17, 2015, after a strong storm hit the area Saturday night and early Sunday morning, destroying the Cole's home. Dangerous weather was centered in southwestern Oklahoma, where tornadoes touched down near Elmer and Tipton, National Weather Service forecaster Daryl Williams said. The most significant damage, according to Oklahoma emergency officials, was to homes, businesses and power lines. (Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP)  (The Associated Press)

Forecasters say the Midwest could be in for another round of strong storms and heavy rain.

The National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center says that severe thunderstorms may develop in parts of Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Texas on Saturday.

The center says there is a risk of large hail, strong winds and several tornadoes with the system.

The greatest chance of severe weather stretches from southern Nebraska to central and western Kansas and Oklahoma.

Last weekend's weather caused several tornadoes, flooding and at least four deaths.