US

Juice would be spilled: What would Florida look like, divided into 2 new states?

  • FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2010, file photo, oranges ripen on a tree in a grove in Clermont, Fla. Original Florida would have to give up its state symbol, the orange, if South Florida seceded since the state would be left without most of its citrus groves. More than 90 percent of Florida’s citrus groves would go with South Florida. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)

    FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2010, file photo, oranges ripen on a tree in a grove in Clermont, Fla. Original Florida would have to give up its state symbol, the orange, if South Florida seceded since the state would be left without most of its citrus groves. More than 90 percent of Florida’s citrus groves would go with South Florida. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this May 2, 2014, file photo, men play dominoes on Calle Ocho (Eighth Street) in Miami's Little Havana.  If South Florida seceded, almost three-quarters of Original Florida’s population would be non-Hispanic white, compared to around half in South Florida. Hispanics would make up almost 30 percent of South Florida’s population. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter, File)

    FILE - In this May 2, 2014, file photo, men play dominoes on Calle Ocho (Eighth Street) in Miami's Little Havana. If South Florida seceded, almost three-quarters of Original Florida’s population would be non-Hispanic white, compared to around half in South Florida. Hispanics would make up almost 30 percent of South Florida’s population. (AP Photo/J Pat Carter, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - This, July 8, 2010, file photo, shows the Miami skyline. If South Florida seceded, Original Florida, which would be everything north of Orlando and Tampa, would have twice as many churches per capita as South Florida. South Florida would have seven times as many as synagogues. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)

    FILE - This, July 8, 2010, file photo, shows the Miami skyline. If South Florida seceded, Original Florida, which would be everything north of Orlando and Tampa, would have twice as many churches per capita as South Florida. South Florida would have seven times as many as synagogues. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)  (The Associated Press)

Some South Florida politicians say they've been ignored long enough by North Florida. Now they want their own state.

The South Miami City Commission is urging the creation of a new state of "South Florida," in a symbolic resolution aimed at leaders in Florida's current capital of Tallahassee.

This secession-scenario is highly unlikely, since it would need approval by the U.S. Congress and Florida voters.

But The Associated Press crunched some numbers on the proposal, which would draw a state line running from above Tampa Bay to above Cape Canaveral.

South Florida would tend Democratic, with a wealthier and more diverse population. North Florida would tend Republican, with average wages 12 percent lower and twice as many churches per capita.