MILITARY

Under indictment, Sen. Menendez accepts diminished role in limiting Iran's nuclear program

Senate Foreign Relations Committee members Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., left, and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., attend a Senate Foreign Relations Committee meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2015, to debate and vote on the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015. A Senate panel has unanimously approved a bill that would give Congress a say about the emerging deal aimed at preventing Iran from developing nuclear weapons in exchange for sanctions relief. The Foreign Relations Committee voted 19-0. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Senate Foreign Relations Committee members Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., left, and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., attend a Senate Foreign Relations Committee meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 14, 2015, to debate and vote on the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015. A Senate panel has unanimously approved a bill that would give Congress a say about the emerging deal aimed at preventing Iran from developing nuclear weapons in exchange for sanctions relief. The Foreign Relations Committee voted 19-0. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)  (The Associated Press)

Sen. Bob Menendez, who is under indictment, is making the best of his diminished status in international matters, backing bipartisan changes to a measure he had co-authored regarding Iran's nuclear program.

Menendez surrendered his post as the top Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee after being indicted April 1 on corruption charges.

The New Jersey senator watched Tuesday as Ben Cardin of Maryland replaced him in the Democratic leader's chair and helped usher the revised bill to unanimous committee approval.

The legislation would give Congress a say in a pending deal meant to prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons in exchange for relief from economic sanctions.

Menendez denies prosecutors' claims that he used his office to help a wealthy friend who had given him gifts.