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Vermont documents 1970s counterculture and its lasting effects on the state

  • In this April 8, 2015 photo, Barbara Nolfi, who was part of the Franklin farming commune, holds up an artifact from the 1970s at a forum held by the Vermont Historical Society in Burlington, Vt. The state's population jumped 15 percent in the 1970s, with more than half of the increase coming from people moving from out of state to experimental communes in Vermont. The state historical society is doing a two-year research project on the era and its lasting influences in the state. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)

    In this April 8, 2015 photo, Barbara Nolfi, who was part of the Franklin farming commune, holds up an artifact from the 1970s at a forum held by the Vermont Historical Society in Burlington, Vt. The state's population jumped 15 percent in the 1970s, with more than half of the increase coming from people moving from out of state to experimental communes in Vermont. The state historical society is doing a two-year research project on the era and its lasting influences in the state. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this April 8, 2015 photo, Ann Taylor speaks about the 1970s at a forum held by the Vermont Historical Society in Burlington, Vt. The state's population jumped 15 percent in the 1970s, with more than half of the increase coming from people moving from out of state to experimental communes in Vermont. The state historical society is doing a two-year research project on the era and its lasting influences in the state. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)

    In this April 8, 2015 photo, Ann Taylor speaks about the 1970s at a forum held by the Vermont Historical Society in Burlington, Vt. The state's population jumped 15 percent in the 1970s, with more than half of the increase coming from people moving from out of state to experimental communes in Vermont. The state historical society is doing a two-year research project on the era and its lasting influences in the state. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this circa 1970's photo provided by the Vermont Historical Society, young people work in a garden at the Pikes Falls community in Jamaica, Vt. The state's population jumped 15 percent in the 1970s, with more than half of the increase coming from people moving from out of state to experimental communes in Vermont. The state historical society is collecting stories and artifacts in a two-year study to document lasting influence the 1970s had on the state. (AP Photo/Rebecca Lepkoff collection of the Vermont Historical Society)

    In this circa 1970's photo provided by the Vermont Historical Society, young people work in a garden at the Pikes Falls community in Jamaica, Vt. The state's population jumped 15 percent in the 1970s, with more than half of the increase coming from people moving from out of state to experimental communes in Vermont. The state historical society is collecting stories and artifacts in a two-year study to document lasting influence the 1970s had on the state. (AP Photo/Rebecca Lepkoff collection of the Vermont Historical Society)  (The Associated Press)

An influx of young people to Vermont in the 1970s brought experimental communes to the hillsides, political and social activism, food cooperatives, drug use and it also sparked fears of a hippie invasion.

Vermont's population, which had been relatively stagnant, jumped 15 percent in the 1970s, with more than half of the increase coming from people moving in from out of state.

Now the Vermont Historical Society is collecting stories and artifacts in a two-year study to document lasting influence the 1970s had on the state. It's holding forums around the state for people to tell their stories, good and bad about that era in Vermont.