Naturalization

South Korean adoptee who had abusive parents, went through US foster care faces deportation

  • Korean adoptee Adam Crapser, left, poses with daughters, Christal, 1, Christina, 5, and his wife, Anh Nguyen, in the family's living room in Vancouver, Wash. on March 19, 2015. Crapser, whose adoptive parents neglected to make him a U.S. citizen, will face an immigration judge and could be separated from his family and deported to South Korea, a country he does not know. (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka)

    Korean adoptee Adam Crapser, left, poses with daughters, Christal, 1, Christina, 5, and his wife, Anh Nguyen, in the family's living room in Vancouver, Wash. on March 19, 2015. Crapser, whose adoptive parents neglected to make him a U.S. citizen, will face an immigration judge and could be separated from his family and deported to South Korea, a country he does not know. (AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka)  (The Associated Press)

  • This undated photo provided by Adam Crapser shows him around the age of 3 with his sister. Abandoned by one adoptive family, separated for nearly three decades from his only biological sister, and exposed to horrific abuse by another American adoptive couple, Crapser struggled with rejection, homelessness and crime. Now, as he’s nearing 40 and has finally formed a family of his own, an immigration policy is threatening to further punish him. A family adopted the girl, and got her citizenship. (AP Photo/Adam Crapser, ho)

    This undated photo provided by Adam Crapser shows him around the age of 3 with his sister. Abandoned by one adoptive family, separated for nearly three decades from his only biological sister, and exposed to horrific abuse by another American adoptive couple, Crapser struggled with rejection, homelessness and crime. Now, as he’s nearing 40 and has finally formed a family of his own, an immigration policy is threatening to further punish him. A family adopted the girl, and got her citizenship. (AP Photo/Adam Crapser, ho)  (The Associated Press)

  • This undated photo provided by Adam Crapser shows him at an undetermined age. Abandoned by one adoptive family, separated for nearly three decades from his only biological sister, and exposed to horrific abuse by another American adoptive couple, Crapser struggled with rejection, homelessness and crime. Now, as he's nearing 40 and has finally formed a family of his own, an immigration policy is threatening to further punish him. (AP Photo/Adam Crapser)

    This undated photo provided by Adam Crapser shows him at an undetermined age. Abandoned by one adoptive family, separated for nearly three decades from his only biological sister, and exposed to horrific abuse by another American adoptive couple, Crapser struggled with rejection, homelessness and crime. Now, as he's nearing 40 and has finally formed a family of his own, an immigration policy is threatening to further punish him. (AP Photo/Adam Crapser)  (The Associated Press)

A 39-year-old man who was adopted from South Korea as a boy but was never naturalized as a U.S. citizen by his parents is facing deportation.

Adam Crapser came to the U.S. with his sister more than three decades ago, but they were later abandoned by their American parents, sent into foster care and separated.

The girl was adopted and became a citizen, while Crapser ended up living with a couple who was abusive and didn't apply for citizenship for him. Crapser has struggled with homelessness and joblessness.

Federal immigration officials say they his criminal convictions, including burglary and assault, make him deportable under immigration law, but they were not aware of his adoption history.

U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Oregon, is proposing an automatic citizenship bill for adoptees like Crapser.