MILITARY

House Republicans eye new approach to avoid Homeland Security partial shutdown

  • Rep. Walter B. Jones, R-N.C., holds up a copy of the Constitution while talking to reporters as House Republicans emerge from a closed-door meeting on how to deal with the impasse over the Homeland Security budget, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015.  GOP lawmakers have been trying to block President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration through the funding for the DHS which expires Friday night. Sounding retreat, House Republicans agreed Thursday night to push short-term funding to prevent a partial shutdown at the Department of Homeland Security while leaving in place Obama administration immigration policies they have vowed to repeal.   (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Rep. Walter B. Jones, R-N.C., holds up a copy of the Constitution while talking to reporters as House Republicans emerge from a closed-door meeting on how to deal with the impasse over the Homeland Security budget, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. GOP lawmakers have been trying to block President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration through the funding for the DHS which expires Friday night. Sounding retreat, House Republicans agreed Thursday night to push short-term funding to prevent a partial shutdown at the Department of Homeland Security while leaving in place Obama administration immigration policies they have vowed to repeal. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)  (The Associated Press)

  • House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio responds to reporters about the impasse over passing the Homeland Security budget because of Republican efforts to block President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. The House voted last month to end Homeland Security funding on Saturday unless Obama reverses his order to protect millions of immigrants from possible deportation. After Democratic filibusters blocked the bill in the Senate, the chamber's Republican leaders agreed this week to offer a "clean" funding measure, with no immigration strings attached.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio responds to reporters about the impasse over passing the Homeland Security budget because of Republican efforts to block President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. The House voted last month to end Homeland Security funding on Saturday unless Obama reverses his order to protect millions of immigrants from possible deportation. After Democratic filibusters blocked the bill in the Senate, the chamber's Republican leaders agreed this week to offer a "clean" funding measure, with no immigration strings attached. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)  (The Associated Press)

  • Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. listens during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, to talk about the impasse over advancing the Homeland Security budget because of Republican efforts to block President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration. Reid is wearing special glasses as he recovers from injuries suffered in a violent exercise accident in December.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. listens during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, to talk about the impasse over advancing the Homeland Security budget because of Republican efforts to block President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration. Reid is wearing special glasses as he recovers from injuries suffered in a violent exercise accident in December. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)  (The Associated Press)

Congress is moving to approve a short-term funding bill for the Homeland Security Department that leaves intact Obama administration immigration policies Republicans vowed to repeal.

The three-week stopgap measure would allow lawmakers to keep the Homeland Security Department running at a time of heightened threats worldwide — even if it does little more than postpone the fight for another day.

The bill would extend current funding levels for the department for three weeks, until March 19. Without action, DHS would begin to shut down at midnight Friday, furloughing 30,000 workers. Another 200,000 would be deemed essential and continue to report to work, albeit without pay.

Some House conservatives insist they won't support the measure, but others argue it preserves their ability to fight President Barack Obama's executive actions deferring deportations.