RELIGION

Amish leader convicted for role in Ohio beard cuttings seeks release when he's resentenced

FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2011 file photo, Sam Mullet stands in front of his home in Bergholz, Ohio. Mullet, the leader of a breakaway Amish group in Ohio whose hate crime convictions for beard- and hair-cutting attacks were overturned, wants a federal judge to release him from prison when he's resentenced next month. All 16 members found guilty in the attacks that targeted Amish who had criticized them are to be resentenced March 2 in Cleveland since the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the most serious convictions against them. Defense attorneys for Mullet said his 15-year sentence should be reduced to the three years he's already served. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, File)

FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2011 file photo, Sam Mullet stands in front of his home in Bergholz, Ohio. Mullet, the leader of a breakaway Amish group in Ohio whose hate crime convictions for beard- and hair-cutting attacks were overturned, wants a federal judge to release him from prison when he's resentenced next month. All 16 members found guilty in the attacks that targeted Amish who had criticized them are to be resentenced March 2 in Cleveland since the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the most serious convictions against them. Defense attorneys for Mullet said his 15-year sentence should be reduced to the three years he's already served. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, File)  (The Associated Press)

The leader of an Amish community in Ohio whose followers cut the hair and beards of Amish who had criticized them wants to be released from prison immediately when he's resentenced.

All 16 members convicted in the hair cuttings are scheduled to be resentenced next month after the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned their hate-crimes convictions.

Defense attorneys for Sam Mullet Sr. are asking a federal judge to reduce his sentence to the three years that he's already served. He'd been sentenced to 15 years.

Prosecutors in Cleveland want the same sentences to stand for Mullet and the others. Some of those convicted have already been released.

Mullet's attorneys say it would be wrong to give him the same sentence when there isn't enough evidence against him.