US

Transgender teen's death stirs action in US and beyond; 'There are so many people like Leelah'

  • This Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015 photo shows Anne Neal, left, embracing Alysia Jones after they both spoke at the vigil at Kings Mills High School to remember the life of Leelah Alcorn, a 17 year-old transgender girl who committed suicide, in Kings Mills, Ohio.  In what's believed to be her final message, Alcorn implored: "My death needs to mean something." It has, at least making her a poignant new face for the transgender movement and those struggling to fit in. (AP Photo/The Enquirer, Meg Vogel)

    This Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015 photo shows Anne Neal, left, embracing Alysia Jones after they both spoke at the vigil at Kings Mills High School to remember the life of Leelah Alcorn, a 17 year-old transgender girl who committed suicide, in Kings Mills, Ohio. In what's believed to be her final message, Alcorn implored: "My death needs to mean something." It has, at least making her a poignant new face for the transgender movement and those struggling to fit in. (AP Photo/The Enquirer, Meg Vogel)  (The Associated Press)

  • This Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015 photo shows a large crowd participating in a group hug at the end of a candle light vigil to remember the life of Leelah Alcorn, a 17 year-old transgender girl who committed suicide, in Kings Mills, Ohio. In what's believed to be her final message, Alcorn implored: "My death needs to mean something." It has, at least making her a poignant new face for the transgender movement and those struggling to fit in. (AP Photo/The Enquirer, Meg Vogel)

    This Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015 photo shows a large crowd participating in a group hug at the end of a candle light vigil to remember the life of Leelah Alcorn, a 17 year-old transgender girl who committed suicide, in Kings Mills, Ohio. In what's believed to be her final message, Alcorn implored: "My death needs to mean something." It has, at least making her a poignant new face for the transgender movement and those struggling to fit in. (AP Photo/The Enquirer, Meg Vogel)  (The Associated Press)

  • This Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015 photo shows Tiffany Neri, left, embracing Cassie Thompson during a group hug at the end of the vigil to remember the life of Leelah Alcorn, a 17 year-old transgender girl who committed suicide, in Kings Mills, Ohio.  In what's believed to be her final message, Alcorn implored: "My death needs to mean something." It has, at least making her a poignant new face for the transgender movement and those struggling to fit in. (AP Photo/The Enquirer, Meg Vogel)

    This Saturday, Jan. 3, 2015 photo shows Tiffany Neri, left, embracing Cassie Thompson during a group hug at the end of the vigil to remember the life of Leelah Alcorn, a 17 year-old transgender girl who committed suicide, in Kings Mills, Ohio. In what's believed to be her final message, Alcorn implored: "My death needs to mean something." It has, at least making her a poignant new face for the transgender movement and those struggling to fit in. (AP Photo/The Enquirer, Meg Vogel)  (The Associated Press)

The death of a transgender teen who wrote an anguished blog post and then stepped in front of a tractor-trailer continues to draw attention and debate nearly a month later.

In the final message attributed to Leelah Alcorn, she pleaded: "My death needs to mean something. ... Fix society. Please."

Although many details about her life and death are still unclear, the Ohio 17-year-old has quickly become the new face of a growing movement of people hungering for acceptance.

Many hope the discussion generated by her death will help lead to more awareness of transgender people and reassure them that they are not alone.