Treason

New Jersey woman, 98, set for NY arguments aimed at clearing atomic spy case conviction

  • Miriam Moskowitz, 98, accompanied by her nephew Ira Moskowitz, leaves federal court in New York on Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014 after a judge rejected her request to erase her 1950 conviction for conspiracy to obstruct justice in the run-up to the atomic spying trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. She served a two-year prison sentence. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

    Miriam Moskowitz, 98, accompanied by her nephew Ira Moskowitz, leaves federal court in New York on Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014 after a judge rejected her request to erase her 1950 conviction for conspiracy to obstruct justice in the run-up to the atomic spying trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. She served a two-year prison sentence. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)  (The Associated Press)

  • Miriam Moskowitz, 98, accompanied by her nephew Ira Moskowitz, leaves federal court in New York on Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014 after a judge rejected her request to erase her 1950 conviction for conspiracy to obstruct justice in the run-up to the atomic spying trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. She served a two-year prison sentence. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

    Miriam Moskowitz, 98, accompanied by her nephew Ira Moskowitz, leaves federal court in New York on Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014 after a judge rejected her request to erase her 1950 conviction for conspiracy to obstruct justice in the run-up to the atomic spying trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. She served a two-year prison sentence. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)  (The Associated Press)

  • Miriam Moskowitz, 98, leaves federal court in New York on Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014 after a judge rejected her request to erase her 1950 conviction for conspiracy to obstruct justice in the run-up to the atomic spying trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. She served a two-year prison sentence. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

    Miriam Moskowitz, 98, leaves federal court in New York on Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014 after a judge rejected her request to erase her 1950 conviction for conspiracy to obstruct justice in the run-up to the atomic spying trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. She served a two-year prison sentence. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)  (The Associated Press)

A 98-year-old New Jersey woman is expected to return to a New York court to challenge her 1950 conviction in the run-up to the atomic spying trial of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg.

Miriam Moskowitz asked a judge earlier this year to reconsider her conviction in light of new evidence that emerged in the last decade. The Washington Township, New Jersey, woman was sentenced to two years in prison after her conspiracy conviction.

The government says she conspired with two men to lie to a grand jury investigating allegations of atomic espionage.

Federal Judge Alvin Hellerstein is set to hear arguments Thursday. He has urged a speedy resolution of the case.

The government has opposed Moskowitz's request, saying her conviction was supported by the evidence.