RELIGION

After Denver girls' attempt to join jihadis, officials and Muslims look toward outreach

FILE - This Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, file photo shows the apartment complex in Aurora, Colo., which police say is the home of one of the three teenage girls who, according to U.S. authorities, were en route to join the Islamic State group in Syria when they were stopped at an airport in Germany. On Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014, a member of the National Counterterrorism Center from Washington, D.C. spoke to parents and Muslim leaders in Denver about the ease with which their children can be radicalized on the Internet. The meeting was the first of authorities' outreach efforts since three teen girls from the neighborhood were stopped from trying to join Islamic State extremists in Syria and resembles similar efforts nationwide to keep kids from going overseas to fight. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

FILE - This Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, file photo shows the apartment complex in Aurora, Colo., which police say is the home of one of the three teenage girls who, according to U.S. authorities, were en route to join the Islamic State group in Syria when they were stopped at an airport in Germany. On Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014, a member of the National Counterterrorism Center from Washington, D.C. spoke to parents and Muslim leaders in Denver about the ease with which their children can be radicalized on the Internet. The meeting was the first of authorities' outreach efforts since three teen girls from the neighborhood were stopped from trying to join Islamic State extremists in Syria and resembles similar efforts nationwide to keep kids from going overseas to fight. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)  (The Associated Press)

Federal law enforcement officials and Muslim leaders in Denver are working together to stop teenagers from being lured to terror after three girls tried to go to Syria to join Islamic State extremists.

FBI officials and community members said at a Thursday meeting that they wanted to build relationships to thwart future problems and develop trust.

Similar efforts are taking place in other cities as terror recruiting becomes easier through the Internet and social media. Authorities and community members in Minneapolis have also been working together after a handful of people were recruited to travel to Syria and take up arms with militants.

Seamus Hughes of the National Counterterrorism Center encouraged parents to closely monitor their children's Internet habits, as jihadi propaganda is tailor-made to attract young people.