US

Slow-moving lava flow burns asphalt while spreading at edge of Hawaii town

  • In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014, and provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava flow from the Kilauea Volcano that began on June 27 pushes its way through a fence of a now-closed refuse transfer station and moves down the slope onto station grounds in Pahoa, Hawaii. The flames are caused by burning asphalt. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)

    In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014, and provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava flow from the Kilauea Volcano that began on June 27 pushes its way through a fence of a now-closed refuse transfer station and moves down the slope onto station grounds in Pahoa, Hawaii. The flames are caused by burning asphalt. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014, and provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava flow from the Kilauea Volcano that began on June 27, has inflated up to the level of the now-closed refuse transfer station fence in Pahoa, Hawaii. A glowing crack provides evidence of the flow's molten interior. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)

    In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014, and provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava flow from the Kilauea Volcano that began on June 27, has inflated up to the level of the now-closed refuse transfer station fence in Pahoa, Hawaii. A glowing crack provides evidence of the flow's molten interior. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014, and provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, a geologist examines the margin of a lobe of lava from the Kilauae Volcano that began on June 27 that has inflated significantly after destroying a residence Monday in Pahoa, Hawaii. A barbed wire fence was surrounded and tilted towards the camera as the flow inflated, so that the fence is now nearly horizontal. The red roof in the background is the garage structure near the house that burned on Monday. The garage was still standing as of noon on Tuesday. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)

    In this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014, and provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, a geologist examines the margin of a lobe of lava from the Kilauae Volcano that began on June 27 that has inflated significantly after destroying a residence Monday in Pahoa, Hawaii. A barbed wire fence was surrounded and tilted towards the camera as the flow inflated, so that the fence is now nearly horizontal. The red roof in the background is the garage structure near the house that burned on Monday. The garage was still standing as of noon on Tuesday. (AP Photo/U.S. Geological Survey)  (The Associated Press)

The stream of lava threatening a small Hawaii town is burning asphalt as it oozes into the driveway of a trash transfer station.

Hawaii County Civil Defense officials said Wednesday the slow-moving lava flow from Kilauea volcano doesn't pose an immediate threat to Pahoa residents, but they are monitoring it closely.

The front of the flow closest to the town's main road is stalled. But officials say lava is spreading from three breakout spots further upslope. One of them is near a cemetery.

Kilauea has been erupting continuously for more than 31 years. The current flow began in June. On Monday, it burned a house for the first time. It has also burned tires, trees and grass since entering Pahoa last month.