MILITARY

US military operations in Syria and Iraq officially named "Inherent Resolve"

FILE - In this Aug. 8, 2014 file photo, an armored vehicle belonging to Kurdish Peshmerga fighters rushes to a bombing site as smoke rises after airstrikes targeting Islamic State militants near the Khazer checkpoint outside of the city of Irbil in northern Iraq. The airstrikes were launched outside the Kurdish regional capital Irbil, and marked the first time U.S. forces have directly targeted the extremist Islamic State group, which controls large areas of Syria and Iraq. It may be less punchy than previous nicknames for U.S. conflicts in the Middle East -- remember Operation Desert Storm and its thunderous attacks on Saddam Hussein’s occupation army -- but the Pentagon has finally named its fight against Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria: Operation Inherent Resolve. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed, File)

FILE - In this Aug. 8, 2014 file photo, an armored vehicle belonging to Kurdish Peshmerga fighters rushes to a bombing site as smoke rises after airstrikes targeting Islamic State militants near the Khazer checkpoint outside of the city of Irbil in northern Iraq. The airstrikes were launched outside the Kurdish regional capital Irbil, and marked the first time U.S. forces have directly targeted the extremist Islamic State group, which controls large areas of Syria and Iraq. It may be less punchy than previous nicknames for U.S. conflicts in the Middle East -- remember Operation Desert Storm and its thunderous attacks on Saddam Hussein’s occupation army -- but the Pentagon has finally named its fight against Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria: Operation Inherent Resolve. (AP Photo/ Khalid Mohammed, File)  (The Associated Press)

Weeks into its air campaign against Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria, the Pentagon has finally announced a name for the operation: "Inherent Resolve."

That's the word from a spokesman for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Col. Ed Thomas, who says his office was ultimately responsible for the naming decision.

Military operations are routinely given official names, in part for administrative reasons. They usually are intended to convey a message. The U.S.-led war in Afghanistan, for example, is named "Operation Enduring Freedom."

The U.S. has more than 1,400 military personnel in Iraq as part of the campaign against the Islamic State group, but none in Syria.