US

Guard caps, clothes, personal effects from 1971 Attica riot recall nightmare of violence, fear

  • Ray Bogart, a former correction officer who was taken hostage during the Attica Prison riot, at his home in Auburn, NY, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. More than 40 years after the nation's deadliest prison uprising, badges, hats and other personal effects collected in the aftermath have been returned to the hostages and victims' families. (AP Photo/Heather Ainsworth)

    Ray Bogart, a former correction officer who was taken hostage during the Attica Prison riot, at his home in Auburn, NY, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. More than 40 years after the nation's deadliest prison uprising, badges, hats and other personal effects collected in the aftermath have been returned to the hostages and victims' families. (AP Photo/Heather Ainsworth)  (The Associated Press)

  • Ray Bogart, a former correction officer taken hostage during the Attica Prison riot, holds what remains of the uniform cap worn during the riot that was recently returned to him, at his home in Auburn, NY, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. (AP Photo/Heather Ainsworth)

    Ray Bogart, a former correction officer taken hostage during the Attica Prison riot, holds what remains of the uniform cap worn during the riot that was recently returned to him, at his home in Auburn, NY, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. (AP Photo/Heather Ainsworth)  (The Associated Press)

  • Ray Bogart, a former correction officer taken hostage during the Attica Prison riot, holds what remains of the uniform cap worn during the riot that was recently returned to him, at his home in Auburn, NY, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. (AP Photo/Heather Ainsworth)

    Ray Bogart, a former correction officer taken hostage during the Attica Prison riot, holds what remains of the uniform cap worn during the riot that was recently returned to him, at his home in Auburn, NY, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. (AP Photo/Heather Ainsworth)  (The Associated Press)

After 43 years, Raymond Bogart finally got his prison guard cap back, and with it a flood of memories of being held hostage in New York's notorious Attica prison riot.

It's stained and brimless, but the Auburn retiree says he's surprised the cap's intact at all given the violence over those five days in 1971 that left 11 staff and 32 inmates dead.

More than 2,000 pieces of clothing, badges, eyeglasses, letters and weapons were plucked from the mud and blood at Attica and held as evidence in investigations and lawsuits over the decades.

The New York State Museum has catalogued them, and correction officials have since privately offered the return of 66 items to some state employees or their survivors. They also plan to return inmate belongings.