MILITARY

Military surplus program gives weapons to a coroner and livestock theft investigator

  • Kim Clark, senior investigator for the Wyoming Livestock Board, gets his horse ready to load onto a trailer with his Colt .45 semi-automatic pistol strapped to his side at his home on Oct. 2, 2014 in Cokeville, Wyo. Clark's law enforcement unit which investigates cattle thefts and other industry related crimes were given seven .45-caliber handguns from a military surplus program roughly three years ago. (AP Photo/George Frey)

    Kim Clark, senior investigator for the Wyoming Livestock Board, gets his horse ready to load onto a trailer with his Colt .45 semi-automatic pistol strapped to his side at his home on Oct. 2, 2014 in Cokeville, Wyo. Clark's law enforcement unit which investigates cattle thefts and other industry related crimes were given seven .45-caliber handguns from a military surplus program roughly three years ago. (AP Photo/George Frey)  (The Associated Press)

  • Kim Clark, senior investigator for the Wyoming Livestock Board, poses for a picture with his Colt .45 semi-automatic pistol on Oct. 2, 2014 in Cokeville, Wyo. Clark's law enforcement unit which investigates cattle thefts and other industry related crimes were given seven .45-caliber handguns from a military surplus program roughly three years ago. (AP Photo/George Frey)

    Kim Clark, senior investigator for the Wyoming Livestock Board, poses for a picture with his Colt .45 semi-automatic pistol on Oct. 2, 2014 in Cokeville, Wyo. Clark's law enforcement unit which investigates cattle thefts and other industry related crimes were given seven .45-caliber handguns from a military surplus program roughly three years ago. (AP Photo/George Frey)  (The Associated Press)

  • Kim Clark, senior investigator for the Wyoming Livestock Board, shows his Colt .45 semi-automatic pistol with "United States Property" stamped into it on Oct. 2, 2014 in Cokeville, Wyo. Clark's law enforcement unit which investigates cattle thefts and other industry related crimes were given seven .45-caliber handguns from a military surplus program roughly three years ago. (AP Photo/George Frey)

    Kim Clark, senior investigator for the Wyoming Livestock Board, shows his Colt .45 semi-automatic pistol with "United States Property" stamped into it on Oct. 2, 2014 in Cokeville, Wyo. Clark's law enforcement unit which investigates cattle thefts and other industry related crimes were given seven .45-caliber handguns from a military surplus program roughly three years ago. (AP Photo/George Frey)  (The Associated Press)

A Defense Department giveaway program that equips local police with surplus military weapons also supplies guns to government agencies with limited law-enforcement powers and a questionable need for high-powered firearms.

An Arkansas coroner got a rifle, a handgun and a Humvee. Military-grade weapons also have gone to agencies that enforce gaming laws at Kansas tribal casinos, weigh 18-wheelers in Mississippi and investigate livestock thefts in Wyoming.

While most of the weapons go to municipal police departments and county sheriffs, an Associated Press review of the Pentagon's 1033 Program shows that a diverse array of other state and local agencies have scooped up guns and other surplus equipment.

The program is under a White House-ordered review following a deadly police shooting in Missouri in August.