DISASTERS

Wyoming officials: No time left this year for permanent landslide fix; work to begin in 2015

FILE - This April 18, 2014 aerial image provided by Tributary Environmental shows a home damaged by a landslide in Jackson, Wyo. Town officials say they don’t have enough time left before cold weather arrives to get going on a project to permanently stabilize a slow-moving landslide that tore one house in two and cut off access to dozens of other homes last spring. The work will begin next year. Meanwhile, next year’s spring thaw presents a concern but for now the slide only is moving at about an inch or two per month, according to George Machan, the chief engineer consulting with town officials on the situation said Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014. (AP Photo/Tributary Environmental) NO SALES

FILE - This April 18, 2014 aerial image provided by Tributary Environmental shows a home damaged by a landslide in Jackson, Wyo. Town officials say they don’t have enough time left before cold weather arrives to get going on a project to permanently stabilize a slow-moving landslide that tore one house in two and cut off access to dozens of other homes last spring. The work will begin next year. Meanwhile, next year’s spring thaw presents a concern but for now the slide only is moving at about an inch or two per month, according to George Machan, the chief engineer consulting with town officials on the situation said Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014. (AP Photo/Tributary Environmental) NO SALES  (The Associated Press)

Work will begin next spring on a project to permanently stabilize a slow-moving landslide that has been affecting a Wyoming neighborhood.

Jackson town officials say they don't have enough time this fall to get going on the project before cold weather arrives.

The landslide prompted the evacuation of dozens of homes and townhouses in April. Homeowners since then have been allowed to return using a temporary drive.

The Jackson Hole News & Guide reports (http://bit.ly/1BzZVTH ) that town officials plan to widen that road this fall.

Last spring, the slide tore a house in two. For a time, town officials worried the landslide could release suddenly onto several businesses downhill.

Consulting engineer George Machan (mac-ANN') says the ground continues to slide between 1 and 2 inches per month.

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Information from: Jackson Hole (Wyo.) News And Guide, http://www.jhnewsandguide.com