DISASTERS

Unusually intense storms mark monsoon season in Southwest

  • FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 8, 2014 file photo, a section of Scottsdale, Ariz.  floods following heavy rains that left motorists stranded during their morning commute. Monsoon season in the Southwest, which officially ended Sept. 30, will go down as a record-breaker. Meteorologists say some areas in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico received more rain in one day than in a normal summer. The intense amount of moisture also brought flood damage that is still being felt in homes and roads throughout the region.  (AP Photo/Matt York, File)

    FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 8, 2014 file photo, a section of Scottsdale, Ariz. floods following heavy rains that left motorists stranded during their morning commute. Monsoon season in the Southwest, which officially ended Sept. 30, will go down as a record-breaker. Meteorologists say some areas in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico received more rain in one day than in a normal summer. The intense amount of moisture also brought flood damage that is still being felt in homes and roads throughout the region. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 8, 2014 file photo, a truck crosses floodwaters on a road in Moapa, Nev. Monsoon season in the Southwest, which officially ended Sept. 30, will go down as a record-breaker. Meteorologists say some areas in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico received more rain in one day than in a normal summer. The intense amount of moisture also brought flood damage that is still being felt in homes and roads throughout the region. (AP Photo/John Locher,File)

    FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 8, 2014 file photo, a truck crosses floodwaters on a road in Moapa, Nev. Monsoon season in the Southwest, which officially ended Sept. 30, will go down as a record-breaker. Meteorologists say some areas in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico received more rain in one day than in a normal summer. The intense amount of moisture also brought flood damage that is still being felt in homes and roads throughout the region. (AP Photo/John Locher,File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 8, 2014 file photo, receding flood water surrounds a home in Moapa, Nev. Flooding throughout the area damaged homes and roads. Monsoon season in the Southwest, which officially ended Sept. 30, will go down as a record-breaker. Meteorologists say some areas in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico received more rain in one day than in a normal summer. The intense amount of moisture also brought flood damage that is still being felt in homes and roads throughout the region. (AP Photo/John Locher,File)

    FILE - In this Monday, Sept. 8, 2014 file photo, receding flood water surrounds a home in Moapa, Nev. Flooding throughout the area damaged homes and roads. Monsoon season in the Southwest, which officially ended Sept. 30, will go down as a record-breaker. Meteorologists say some areas in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico received more rain in one day than in a normal summer. The intense amount of moisture also brought flood damage that is still being felt in homes and roads throughout the region. (AP Photo/John Locher,File)  (The Associated Press)

This year's Southwest monsoon season will be remembered for unusually intense storms that brought months' worth of rain in just one day.

The National Weather Service says some areas in Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico received more rain in a day than in a typical season.

The traditional monsoon season runs from mid-June to the end of September and is characterized by thunderstorms that stir up dust storms or rain.

Meteorologists say Phoenix received more than 6 inches of rain, making it the seventh wettest season on record.

In Nevada, Las Vegas had its 31st wettest monsoon season with more than an inch of rain. In New Mexico, metropolitan Albuquerque received more than 5 inches.

Some homes and roads in the region are still awaiting repairs from flood damage.