US

After 3-year legal spat, federal appeals court reinstates Wisconsin voter ID law

FILE - In this June 5, 2012 file photo, voting ballots are stacked and ready as voters wait in line to cast their ballot in Milwaukee. A federal appeals panel was set to hear arguments Friday, Sept. 12, 2014 on whether an embattled Wisconsin law requiring voters to show photo identification at the polls should be reactivated in time for the November elections following a nearly three-year legal battle. Attorneys representing the state Justice Department were expected to defend the law in front of a three-judge panel of the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago.  (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps, File)

FILE - In this June 5, 2012 file photo, voting ballots are stacked and ready as voters wait in line to cast their ballot in Milwaukee. A federal appeals panel was set to hear arguments Friday, Sept. 12, 2014 on whether an embattled Wisconsin law requiring voters to show photo identification at the polls should be reactivated in time for the November elections following a nearly three-year legal battle. Attorneys representing the state Justice Department were expected to defend the law in front of a three-judge panel of the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago. (AP Photo/Jeffrey Phelps, File)  (The Associated Press)

A federal appeals court has reinstated Wisconsin's voter photo identification law.

U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman struck the law down as unconstitutional in April, saying it unfairly burdens poor and minority voters who may lack such identification. Republican Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen asked the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago to overturn that ruling.

The 7th Circuit issued a ruling late Friday afternoon lifting Aldeman's stay and allowing the law to go into effect before the November elections.

State attorneys asked a three-judge 7th Circuit panel during oral arguments on Friday to immediately reinstate the law.

Van Hollen's appeal remains in play, however. The judges say they'll issue a ruling on the merits later.