US

Rodents have numbers advantage in NY rat race, but humans are fighting to retake neighborhoods

  • FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2005 file photo, a rat comes briefly out of its hole at a subway stop in the Brooklyn borough of New York, before retreating at the arrival of the F train. New York City is gearing up for its latest war on rats with an army of inspectors will descend on the city’s most rat-infested neighborhoods, targeting the parks, sewers and dumping areas where rats congregate and breed. (AP Photo Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

    FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2005 file photo, a rat comes briefly out of its hole at a subway stop in the Brooklyn borough of New York, before retreating at the arrival of the F train. New York City is gearing up for its latest war on rats with an army of inspectors will descend on the city’s most rat-infested neighborhoods, targeting the parks, sewers and dumping areas where rats congregate and breed. (AP Photo Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE- In this June 15, 2010 file photo, a rat wanders the subway tracks at Union Square in New York. In July 2014, New York City will fire another salvo in its war on rats. Financed with $611,000 in the budget, inspectors will work with neighborhood associations, community boards, elected officials and building owners to plug up rat holes and put poison in rodent tunnels. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)

    FILE- In this June 15, 2010 file photo, a rat wanders the subway tracks at Union Square in New York. In July 2014, New York City will fire another salvo in its war on rats. Financed with $611,000 in the budget, inspectors will work with neighborhood associations, community boards, elected officials and building owners to plug up rat holes and put poison in rodent tunnels. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE- In this June 15, 2010 file photo, a rat moves along the ground near the subway tracks at Union Square in New York. In July 2014, New York City plans to got to war with its rat population. Financed with $611,000 from the City's budget, an army of inspectors will descend on the city’s most rat-infested neighborhoods, targeting the parks, sewers and dumping areas where rats congregate and breed. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)

    FILE- In this June 15, 2010 file photo, a rat moves along the ground near the subway tracks at Union Square in New York. In July 2014, New York City plans to got to war with its rat population. Financed with $611,000 from the City's budget, an army of inspectors will descend on the city’s most rat-infested neighborhoods, targeting the parks, sewers and dumping areas where rats congregate and breed. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II, File)  (The Associated Press)

New York City is gearing up for its latest war on rats.

Starting next month, an army of inspectors will descend on the city's most rat-infested neighborhoods, targeting the parks, sewers and dumping areas where rats congregate and breed.

It's part of the city's latest effort to attack a rat population that some experts estimate could be double that of the Big Apple's 8.4 million human residents.

Financed with $611,000 in the budget, inspectors will work with neighborhood associations, community boards, elected officials and building owners to plug up rat holes and put poison in rodent tunnels.

Professional exterminator Joel Grassi says the goal is to target the rats' food supply. But, he says, "As long as there are human beings in New York City, there will be rats."