US

Ex-exec claiming Los Angeles police beating admits using bath salts but not before incident

  • Former Deutsche Bank executive Brian Mulligan, center, arrives with his wife Victoria, second from left, with unidentified attorneys, at the Edward R. Roybal Federal Building, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, in Los Angeles. A trial began for Mulligan, who sued the city of Los Angeles and two police officers claiming they beat him during a bizarre incident in May 2012. He is seeking $20 million in damages in a lawsuit filed in federal court. Officers said Mulligan told them he had ingested a type of bath salts known as White Lightning. Mulligan, who has no prior criminal record, once served as co-chairman of Universal Studios and chief financial officer of Seagram Co. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

    Former Deutsche Bank executive Brian Mulligan, center, arrives with his wife Victoria, second from left, with unidentified attorneys, at the Edward R. Roybal Federal Building, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, in Los Angeles. A trial began for Mulligan, who sued the city of Los Angeles and two police officers claiming they beat him during a bizarre incident in May 2012. He is seeking $20 million in damages in a lawsuit filed in federal court. Officers said Mulligan told them he had ingested a type of bath salts known as White Lightning. Mulligan, who has no prior criminal record, once served as co-chairman of Universal Studios and chief financial officer of Seagram Co. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)  (The Associated Press)

  • Former Deutsche Bank executive Brian Mulligan, left, arrives with his wife Victoria, center, at the Edward R. Roybal Federal Building, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, in Los Angeles. A trial began for Mulligan, who sued the city of Los Angeles and two police officers claiming they beat him during a bizarre incident in May 2012. He is seeking $20 million in damages in a lawsuit filed in federal court. Officers said Mulligan told them he had ingested a type of bath salts known as White Lightning. Mulligan, who has no prior criminal record, once served as co-chairman of Universal Studios and chief financial officer of Seagram Co. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

    Former Deutsche Bank executive Brian Mulligan, left, arrives with his wife Victoria, center, at the Edward R. Roybal Federal Building, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, in Los Angeles. A trial began for Mulligan, who sued the city of Los Angeles and two police officers claiming they beat him during a bizarre incident in May 2012. He is seeking $20 million in damages in a lawsuit filed in federal court. Officers said Mulligan told them he had ingested a type of bath salts known as White Lightning. Mulligan, who has no prior criminal record, once served as co-chairman of Universal Studios and chief financial officer of Seagram Co. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)  (The Associated Press)

A former executive who claims he was beaten by two Los Angeles police officers has acknowledged snorting so-called bath salts but not at the time of the incident.

Brian Mulligan was cross-examined Wednesday in federal court, where he is suing for $20 million in damages.

The onetime executive of Deutsche Bank said he used bath salts to deal with sleeping problems but denied the substance made him paranoid at the time of the 2012 confrontation.

Mulligan said that after using bath salts at least 20 times he had negative effects including anxiety and jitteriness.

Mulligan denied a defense accusation that he invented portions of his story and of hallucinating in the presence of the officers, but did testify he told them there might be people following him.