Menu

US

It's Obama House vs. Guevara House at Eagle Academy, a network of all-boys NYC public schools

  • In this Oct. 23, 2013 photo, eighth-grader Elijah Landsman answers a question in a humanities class at Eagle Academy in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013. The all-male model of the academy, once seen as sexist and outdated, has been resurrected to serve a population of youths who advocates feared were likelier headed to prison than to college. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)The Associated Press

  • In this Oct. 23, 2013 photo, a student knots his necktie at Eagle Academy in the Bronx borough of New York. When the academy opened in the Bronx in 2004 it was New York City’s first all-boys public school in more than 30 years. The all-male model was once seen as sexist and outdated. But it has been resurrected to serve a population of youths who advocates feared were likelier headed to prison than to college. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)The Associated Press

  • In this Oct. 23, 2013 photo, student recite the poem "Invictus" by William Ernest Henley at Eagle Academy in the Bronx borough of New York. When the academy opened in the Bronx in 2004 it was New York City’s first all-boys public school in more than 30 years. The all-male model was once seen as sexist and outdated. But it has been resurrected to serve a population of youths who advocates feared were likelier headed to prison than to college. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)The Associated Press

  • In this Oct. 23, 2013 photo, students write a response in a humanities class at Eagle Academy in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013. The all-male model of the academy, once seen as sexist and outdated, has been resurrected to serve a population of youths who advocates feared were likelier headed to prison than to college. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)The Associated Press

  • In this Oct. 23, 2013 photo, students write a response in a humanities class at Eagle Academy in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013. The all-male model of the academy, once seen as sexist and outdated, has been resurrected to serve a population of youths who advocates feared were likelier headed to prison than to college. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)The Associated Press

When the Eagle Academy for Young Men opened in the Bronx in 2004 it was New York City's first all-boys public school in more than 30 years.

The all-male model was once seen as sexist and outdated. But it has been resurrected to serve a population of youths who advocates feared were likelier headed to prison than to college.

The Eagle Academy was seen as one solution: a network of all-boys schools in high-poverty neighborhoods.

Nine years after the Bronx school started there are additional Eagle Academies in Brooklyn, Queens, Newark, N.J. and Harlem.

Parents say they like the single-sex atmosphere because there are fewer distractions. But some of the boys say they would rather go to school with girls.