Menu

US

AP chief Carroll praises new DOJ protections for journalists after widespread records seizure

  • Kathleen Carroll, executive editor and senior vice president of The Associated Press, participates in a panel discussion titled "Is Journalism a Crime?" at the 80th Annual Associated Press Media Editors' conference at the Indiana State Museum in Indianapolis Monday, Oct. 28, 2013. (AP Photo/Doug McSchooler)The Associated Press

  • Kathleen Carroll, executive editor and senior vice president of The Associated Press, center, listens to the commentary of fellow panelist Gary Ross, left, during a panel discussion titled "Is Journalism a Crime?" at the 80th Annual Associated Press Media Editors' conference at the Indiana State Museum in Indianapolis Monday, Oct. 28, 2013. (AP Photo/Doug McSchooler)The Associated Press

  • A panel discussion titled "Is Journalism a Crime?" features panelists, from left, Gary Ross, a special agent with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and author of "Who Watches the Watchmen: The Conflict Between National Security and Freedom of the Press"; Kathleen Carroll, executive editor and senior vice president of The Associated Press; and Dom Caristi, professor of telecommunications at Ball State University, during the 80th Annual Associated Press Media Editors' conference at the Indiana State Museum in Indianapolis Monday, Oct. 28, 2013.. Gene Policinski, CEO of Newseum Institute, not pictured, lead the discussion group. (AP Photo/Doug McSchooler)The Associated Press

Associated Press Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll says she is looking forward to the start of new Obama administration efforts to provide better press protections, months after the widespread collection of AP phone records.

Department of Justice officials acknowledged in the spring they seized records for 21 AP phone lines during an investigation into who provided information for an AP story in May 2012 on a foiled al-Qaida bomb plot in Yemen.

Carroll criticized the "overly broad" nature of the information the government gathered but praised the administration's decision to approve a new policy protecting journalists after widespread public criticism.

Carroll's comments came during a discussion at the Associated Press Media Editors' 80th annual conference in Indianapolis on the question of whether journalism can be a crime.