US

Deaths during strike move Calif. transit agency to change rules regarding safety on tracks

  • Bay Area Rapid Transit passengers pass through a train Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013, in Oakland, Calif.  The labor clash now appears to be heading toward resolution, but unions now face calls to ban transit strikes, and political leaders are struggling to assure communities they won’t be economically and socially jeopardized again by union disputes. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

    Bay Area Rapid Transit passengers pass through a train Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013, in Oakland, Calif. The labor clash now appears to be heading toward resolution, but unions now face calls to ban transit strikes, and political leaders are struggling to assure communities they won’t be economically and socially jeopardized again by union disputes. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)  (The Associated Press)

  • Bay Area Rapid Transit passengers enter a BART station Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013, in Oakland, Calif. A contentious, on-again, off-again Bay Area transit strike infuriated hundreds of thousands of commuters forced to wait hours for overcrowded buses and ferries and brought grave questions when two workers were killed. The labor clash now appears to be heading toward resolution, but unions now face calls to ban transit strikes, and political leaders are struggling to assure communities they won’t be economically and socially jeopardized again by union disputes. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

    Bay Area Rapid Transit passengers enter a BART station Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013, in Oakland, Calif. A contentious, on-again, off-again Bay Area transit strike infuriated hundreds of thousands of commuters forced to wait hours for overcrowded buses and ferries and brought grave questions when two workers were killed. The labor clash now appears to be heading toward resolution, but unions now face calls to ban transit strikes, and political leaders are struggling to assure communities they won’t be economically and socially jeopardized again by union disputes. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)  (The Associated Press)

  • With the BART transit system on strike, people line up along the Embarcadero near the Ferry Building and walk to catch a ferry to Oakland, Calif., during the afternoon commute Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, in San Francisco. Frustrated San Francisco Bay Area commuters started the work week Monday facing gridlocked roadways and long lines for buses and ferries as a major transit strike entered its fourth day, increasing pressure on negotiators to reach a deal that resumes train service. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

    With the BART transit system on strike, people line up along the Embarcadero near the Ferry Building and walk to catch a ferry to Oakland, Calif., during the afternoon commute Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, in San Francisco. Frustrated San Francisco Bay Area commuters started the work week Monday facing gridlocked roadways and long lines for buses and ferries as a major transit strike entered its fourth day, increasing pressure on negotiators to reach a deal that resumes train service. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)  (The Associated Press)

The Bay Area Rapid Transit district is eliminating its practice of making worker teams solely responsible for their own safety on the tracks of the commuter rail line.

The move comes after two BART workers were killed Saturday in an accident on an above-ground section of track between two stations.

BART Assistant General Manager Paul Oversier told the transit agency's board of directors on Thursday that the rules being jettisoned are the No. 1 issue that federal safety investigators are studying in their review of the accident.

The two workers, both experienced transportation engineers, had received what BART calls simple approval to inspect the tracks.

Under that process, one worker is designated as a lookout to warn the other of an oncoming train in a work zone.

Now, train operators will either have to slow down significantly or stop as they approach a work zone.