Menu

MILITARY

On top of failed inspections, US nuclear force now hit with alleged top-level misbehavior

  • This undated handout photo provided by the U.S. Air Force shows Maj. Gen. Michael J. Carey. The Air Force is firing Carey, the two-star general in charge of all of its nuclear missiles, in response to an investigation into alleged personal misbehavior, officials told The Associated Press on Friday, Oct. 11, 2013. Carey is being removed from command of the 20th Air Force, which is responsible for three wings of intercontinental ballistic missiles — a total of 450 missiles at three bases across the country, the officials said. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force)The Associated Press

  • This undated handout photo provided by the US Air Force shows Lt. Gen. James M. Kowalski. The Air Force is firing the two-star general in charge of all of its nuclear missiles in response to an investigation into alleged personal misbehavior, officials told The Associated Press on Friday. Maj. Gen. Michael Carey is being removed from command of the 20th Air Force, which is responsible for three wings of intercontinental ballistic missiles — a total of 450 missiles at three bases across the country, the officials said. The decision was made by Kowalski, commander of Air Force Global Strike Command. Kowalski is in charge of all Air Force nuclear weapons, including bombers. (AP Photo/US Air Force)The Associated Press

  • This undated handout photo provided by the US Air Force shows Maj. Gen. Jack Weinstein. The Air Force is firing the two-star general in charge of all of its nuclear missiles in response to an investigation into alleged personal misbehavior, officials told The Associated Press on Friday. Maj. Gen. Michael Carey is being removed from command of the 20th Air Force, which is responsible for three wings of intercontinental ballistic missiles — a total of 450 missiles at three bases across the country, the officials said. Weinstein will temporarily replace Carey as head of 20th Air Force. (AP Photo/US Air Force)The Associated Press

First it was bad attitudes among young officers in nuclear missile launch centers. Now it's alleged bad behavior by two of the nuclear arsenal's top commanders.

Together the missteps spell trouble for a nuclear force now compelled to explain how firing key commanders this week should not shake public confidence.

The Air Force on Friday fired Maj. Gen. Michael Carey, who was in charge of its nuclear missiles. Two days earlier the Navy sacked Vice Adm. Tim Giardina (jee-ahr-DEEN'-uh), the second-in-command at U.S. Strategic Command. That's the command that writes the military's nuclear war plans and would transmit launch orders in a nuclear war.

The nation's most senior nuclear commander, Air Force Gen. Robert Kehler, tells The Associated Press that despite the bad behavior, the nuclear force is stable.